2013
DOI: 10.1001/2013.jamapsychiatry.60
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Potential of Pretreatment Neural Activity in the Visual Cortex During Emotional Processing to Predict Treatment Response to Scopolamine in Major Depressive Disorder

Abstract: The need for improved treatment options for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) is critical. Faster-acting antidepressants and biomarkers that predict clinical response will facilitate treatment. Scopolamine produces rapid antidepressant effects and thus offers the opportunity to characterize potential biomarkers of treatment response within short periods.Objective: To determine if baseline brain activity when processing emotional information can predict treatment response to scopolamine in MDD.Desig… Show more

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Cited by 91 publications
(81 citation statements)
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“…However, as cited above, our group and others have demonstrated differential levels of amino acid neurotransmitters with response to successful antidepressant therapies in the occipital cortex. Additionally, there are several recent studies demonstrating abnormal function of the visual cortex in depression that changes [51, 52] and possibly predicts treatment outcome [53]. A third major limitation of our study is the absence of a non-intervention (“placebo”) group in both the CBT and pharmacotherapy phases to control for non-specific clinical and neuroimaging effects.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, as cited above, our group and others have demonstrated differential levels of amino acid neurotransmitters with response to successful antidepressant therapies in the occipital cortex. Additionally, there are several recent studies demonstrating abnormal function of the visual cortex in depression that changes [51, 52] and possibly predicts treatment outcome [53]. A third major limitation of our study is the absence of a non-intervention (“placebo”) group in both the CBT and pharmacotherapy phases to control for non-specific clinical and neuroimaging effects.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Ketamine and scopolamine have been shown to have antidepressant effects which emerge in hours to days rather than weeks, making them intriguing candidates for exploring prediction of effects [32]. Furey et al [33] examined the prediction of the rapid antidepressant effect of scopolamine using fMRI during a face identity and face emotion working memory task in 15 depressed patients. Baseline BOLD response in the bilateral middle occipital cortex, specifically during emotion working memory, correlated with treatment response magnitude (percentage change in MADRS).…”
Section: Novel Candidate Antidepressant Treatmentsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Therefore, an urgent need exists to identify clinically applicable predictors of treatment response. Prediction tools studied previously include clinical parameters (Fava et al 2008), functional neuroimaging (Furey et al 2013;Samson et al 2011), quantitative electroencephalography ), (pharmaco)genetics (Benedetti et al 2012;Binder et al 2010;Brouwer et al 2006;Hunter et al 2013;McMahon et al 2006;Tansey et al 2012), and gene expression profiling ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%