2014
DOI: 10.1111/mec.12614
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Postglacial northward expansion and genetic differentiation between migratory and sedentary populations of the broad‐tailed hummingbird (Selasphorus platycercus)

Abstract: Unlike other migratory hummingbirds in North America, the broad-tailed hummingbird (Selasphorus platycercus) exhibits both long-distance migratory behaviour in the USA and sedentary behaviour in Mexico and Guatemala. We examined the evolution of migration linked to its northward expansion using a multiperspective approach. We analysed variation in morphology, mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, estimated migration rates between migratory and sedentary populations, compared divergence times with the occurrence of Qu… Show more

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Cited by 41 publications
(50 citation statements)
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“…Increased genomic resources and behavioural data will likely confirm that they constitute separate taxonomic species. These findings are in line with several examples of recent speciation events reported in hummingbird species, some of which show congruent genetic and phenotypic divergence (González, Ornelas & Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, 2011;, while others show genetic divergence and no apparent plumage divergence (Rodríguez-Gó mez, Licona-Vera & Ornelas, 2014;Malpica & Ornelas, 2014). Additional genome-wide markers might help to elucidate the evolutionary history of this young system, in which detecting divergence in a few genes under selection may be critical for proper species delimitation.…”
Section: Taxonomic Implicationssupporting
confidence: 68%
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“…Increased genomic resources and behavioural data will likely confirm that they constitute separate taxonomic species. These findings are in line with several examples of recent speciation events reported in hummingbird species, some of which show congruent genetic and phenotypic divergence (González, Ornelas & Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, 2011;, while others show genetic divergence and no apparent plumage divergence (Rodríguez-Gó mez, Licona-Vera & Ornelas, 2014;Malpica & Ornelas, 2014). Additional genome-wide markers might help to elucidate the evolutionary history of this young system, in which detecting divergence in a few genes under selection may be critical for proper species delimitation.…”
Section: Taxonomic Implicationssupporting
confidence: 68%
“…This divergence time has been reported for species/subspecies mtDNA level splits in other Mesoamerican avian groups (e.g., Barrera-Guzmán et al, 2012;Ornelas et al, 2013;Malpica & Ornelas, 2014;Rodríguez-Gómez & Ornelas, 2014), suggesting an important role of Pleistocene glacial cycles in autochthonous diversification. Given that divergence time estimates were obtained with mtDNA only (not likely to resemble the species phylogeny), divergence times might differ substantially if estimated with both mtDNA and nuDNA sequence data (McCormack, Zellemer & Knowles, 2010).…”
Section: Genetic Introgression Mediated By Quaternary Climatic Oscillmentioning
confidence: 93%
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“…Owing to the panmictic nature of the population in North America, our results provide a new outlook on monarch butterfly migration pathways. Results here also indicate that different migration strategies, such as the use of different overwintering sites or the presence of non-migratory behaviour, can be maintained between populations despite high levels of gene flow [38], as also seen in the admixed populations of migratory and sedentary groups of broad-tailed hummingbirds in North America [59]. A similar lack of neutral genetic differentiation has been observed in other highly mobile, migrating species, such as hoverflies with different overwintering strategies in France [60] and blackcaps with different migratory behaviours and destinations in Europe [61].…”
Section: (B) Implicationsmentioning
confidence: 83%
“…We ran two individual analyses to estimate TMRCA, one with all the ND2 sequences of bee hummingbirds available from previous studies [6][7],[37][38] and retrieved from GenBank, and the second with the mtDNA sequences (ND2 and ATPase) generated in our study for D. eliza and the other hummingbird species listed above. All sequences used and those retrieved from GenBank are listed with their accession numbers in Table S2 .…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%