2019
DOI: 10.1590/1676-0611-bn-2018-0625
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Abstract: Timing of activity is a consequence of adaptations to daily and seasonal changes in the environment and examining these patterns is important to better understand the temporal niches of the species. Here we examine temporal activity in the Red-rumped Agouti (Dasyprocta leporina) in two fragments of Atlantic Forest and those factors that influence the circadian rhythm in the study areas. Camera traps were used to gather data in two protected areas (one montane and other coastal) in the state of Espírito Santo, … Show more

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Cited by 1 publication
(2 citation statements)
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“…Percentages were used so that any differences related to the absolute number of records did not affect the visual comparison of the activity patterns recorded. The activity peak was defined when the percentage of captures in any given hour was 50% greater than the hour with the greatest percent of captures [23].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Percentages were used so that any differences related to the absolute number of records did not affect the visual comparison of the activity patterns recorded. The activity peak was defined when the percentage of captures in any given hour was 50% greater than the hour with the greatest percent of captures [23].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…From the comparison of the results of previous studies performed with M. americana and M. gouazoubira, we observe that there are peculiarities in the activity time for the same species of brocket deer between sites (intraspecific variations), and the differences are related to the hours of more intense activity and occasional periods of inactivity. These variations may be attributed to differences in the photoperiod between the sampled sites, which varies with latitude [5]; local effect of altitude associated with topography on the incidence of solar rays inside the vegetation at each study area [23]; differences in the ambient temperature between regions [6,23]; local variations in the response to competition between Mazama spp. [15]; the size of the studied remnants [6]; or changes in the activity pattern in response to the presence of hunters [6].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%