2019
DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1008035
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Phytoplasma SAP11 effector destabilization of TCP transcription factors differentially impact development and defence of Arabidopsis versus maize

Abstract: Phytoplasmas are insect-transmitted bacterial pathogens that colonize a wide range of plant species, including vegetable and cereal crops, and herbaceous and woody ornamentals. Phytoplasma-infected plants often show dramatic symptoms, including proliferation of shoots (witch’s brooms), changes in leaf shapes and production of green sterile flowers (phyllody). Aster Yellows phytoplasma Witches’ Broom (AY-WB) infects dicots and its effector, secreted AYWB protein 11 (SAP11), was shown to be responsible for the i… Show more

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Cited by 58 publications
(57 citation statements)
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“…Phytoplasmas infect most vascular plant species and often induce massive changes in plant architecture, such as excessive proliferations of shoots and branches (witches’ brooms) and retrograde development of flowers into leaf-like organs (phyllody) (Hoshi et al, 2009; MacLean et al, 2011; Maejima et al, 2014; Sugio et al, 2011a). Plants exhibiting exhibit extensive architectural changes as the result of pathogen infections are described as ‘Zombies’, as the plants stop reproducing themselves and serve only as a habitat for the pathogens and their insect vectors (Al-Subhi et al, 2020; Cano et al, 2013; Du Toit, 2014; MacLean et al, 2014; Orlovskis and Hogenhout, 2016; Pecher et al, 2019; Rumpler et al, 2015; Sugio et al, 2011a). The three-way interactions among phytoplasmas, plants and insects, provide an excellent system to study the genetic basis of extended phenotypes created by obligate multi-host parasites (Huang et al, 2020; Sugio et al, 2011b).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Phytoplasmas infect most vascular plant species and often induce massive changes in plant architecture, such as excessive proliferations of shoots and branches (witches’ brooms) and retrograde development of flowers into leaf-like organs (phyllody) (Hoshi et al, 2009; MacLean et al, 2011; Maejima et al, 2014; Sugio et al, 2011a). Plants exhibiting exhibit extensive architectural changes as the result of pathogen infections are described as ‘Zombies’, as the plants stop reproducing themselves and serve only as a habitat for the pathogens and their insect vectors (Al-Subhi et al, 2020; Cano et al, 2013; Du Toit, 2014; MacLean et al, 2014; Orlovskis and Hogenhout, 2016; Pecher et al, 2019; Rumpler et al, 2015; Sugio et al, 2011a). The three-way interactions among phytoplasmas, plants and insects, provide an excellent system to study the genetic basis of extended phenotypes created by obligate multi-host parasites (Huang et al, 2020; Sugio et al, 2011b).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In witches’ broom, the phytoplasma effector SAP11 causes the degradation of A. thaliana TCP transcription factors that repress branching and mediate leaf development; this results in branchy plants with crinkly leaves (Sugio et al ., ). Homologs of these TCP transcription factors and SAP11 also interact in apple and in maize, where phytoplasmas cause witches’ broom and disrupted floral development, respectively (Janik et al ., ; Pecher et al ., ). Thus, protein–protein interactions between conserved host transcription factors and pathogen effectors can link developmental regulation and proteasome degradation, resulting in large‐scale changes to plant form.…”
Section: Phytoplasma Effectors and Developmental Remodelingmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…Phytoplasma effectors have dramatic impacts on plant development and induce several distinct symptoms characteristic of diseases. For example, SAP11 effectors from diverse phytoplasmas induce a range of phenotypes when stably expressed in plants, including crinkled leaves and siliques, increased stem proliferation, altered root architecture, and abnormal glandular trichome development ( Sugio et al, 2011b ; Lu et al, 2014 ; Tan et al, 2016 ; Chang et al, 2018 ; Wang et al, 2018 ; Pecher et al, 2019 ). The role of these diverse plant phenotypes induced by phytoplasma effectors remains an important subject of future research.…”
Section: Critical Pathogenicity Determinantsmentioning
confidence: 99%