Proceedings of the Seventh International Workshop on Computing Education Research 2011
DOI: 10.1145/2016911.2016934
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Abstract: Many novice programmers view programming tools as allknowing, infallible authorities about what is right and wrong about code. This misconception is particularly detrimental to beginners, who may view the cold, terse, and often judgmental errors from compilers as a sign of personal failure. It is possible, however, that attributing this failure to the computer, rather than the learner, may improve learners' motivation to program. To test this hypothesis, we present Gidget, a game where the eponymous robot prot… Show more

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Cited by 88 publications
(48 citation statements)
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“…Principle P3-fallible has previously been shown [17] to be important in helping learners focus on their progress rather than on their failures/mistakes, and it seemed to promote engagement among our camp participants. However, we also identified problem-solving antipatterns that suggest that participants trusted the original code too much and did not scrutinizing it thoroughly.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 93%
See 2 more Smart Citations
“…Principle P3-fallible has previously been shown [17] to be important in helping learners focus on their progress rather than on their failures/mistakes, and it seemed to promote engagement among our camp participants. However, we also identified problem-solving antipatterns that suggest that participants trusted the original code too much and did not scrutinizing it thoroughly.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 93%
“…Descriptions of earlier versions of Gidget have been reported elsewhere [17,18,19], so here we focus only on the details needed for this paper.…”
Section: The Gidget Prototypementioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…[101]). Lee and Ko [76] used this theory as the foundation for their research into play, showing that the personification of a compiler could be used to improve motivation when learning computer programming. Further to this, other games such as RAPUNSEL have been shown to improve learner's programming self-efficacy [99].…”
Section: Social Cognitive and Psychological Influencesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Traver [31] suggests a number of guiding principles for compiler messages, including clarity and brevity, specificity and locality, which also support this notion. Lee and Ko [21] found that personifying compiler feedback using a robot agent improved novices' completion of levels in a programming game, suggesting that some improvement of error messages is possible.…”
Section: Syntax Errorsmentioning
confidence: 99%