2019
DOI: 10.1590/1676-0611-bn-2018-0716
| View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: According to the enemy release hypothesis (ERH) the spread of invasive species will be facilitated by release from their enemies as they occupy new areas. However, the ERH has rarely been tested by comparing populations of native (non-invasive, long established) species with expanding or shifting ranges, to the same species as invasive in another area. We tested the ERH with respect to blood parasite levels (prevalence and intensity of Plasmodium spp. and Haemoproteus spp.) of (a) two closely related, widely d… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
2

Citation Types

1
3
0

Year Published

2019
2019
2023
2023

Publication Types

Select...
7
2

Relationship

0
9

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 10 publications
(4 citation statements)
references
References 44 publications
(58 reference statements)
1
3
0
Order By: Relevance
“…In the present study, Plasmodium, and Haemoproteus protozoan parasite were identified in partridges. Out of the total examined birds (100) in this study, 60(60%) were infected at least with one of the protozoan parasite this result concurs with prevalence reported by (28) that was (60%), and was relatively high compared to that previously reported (32.9%, 3.91%) from southern Iran (29,30), (7.7%) in Iraq (31), (5.9%) in Japan (32) and (6.2%) in Bulgaria (33).The high prevalence rate of blood parasites (60%) in the studied regions of Sulaimani Province, North of Iraq, maybe due to appropriate environmental conditions for vectors as well as the large population of free-ranging poultry in the area where they kept in free-range systems or on pastures are more exposed to vectors. Forty six samples (46%) were diagnosed to be infected with Plasmodium spp.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 91%
“…In the present study, Plasmodium, and Haemoproteus protozoan parasite were identified in partridges. Out of the total examined birds (100) in this study, 60(60%) were infected at least with one of the protozoan parasite this result concurs with prevalence reported by (28) that was (60%), and was relatively high compared to that previously reported (32.9%, 3.91%) from southern Iran (29,30), (7.7%) in Iraq (31), (5.9%) in Japan (32) and (6.2%) in Bulgaria (33).The high prevalence rate of blood parasites (60%) in the studied regions of Sulaimani Province, North of Iraq, maybe due to appropriate environmental conditions for vectors as well as the large population of free-ranging poultry in the area where they kept in free-range systems or on pastures are more exposed to vectors. Forty six samples (46%) were diagnosed to be infected with Plasmodium spp.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 91%
“…To our knowledge, general patterns of infections have rarely been characterized in the same focal bird species as in the current study (but see Colautti et al, 2005). Indeed, few studies have compared the haemosporidian parasite infections in native and introduced populations within the same host species at a regional (Ishtiaq et al, 2006; Lewicki et al, 2014), inter‐continental (Antonini et al, 2019; Clark et al, 2015; Lima et al, 2010; Marzal et al, 2018; Prüter et al, 2020) or global scale (Marzal et al, 2011).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Prevalence may increase with age of host, since older individuals tend to have higher infection risk as a result of accumulated exposure to parasites or potentially immunosenescence (Atkinson et al, 1995;Ricklefs et al, 2005;Wood et al, 2007;Eastwood et al, 2019). However, this relationship is not consistent among studies and is not always observed, which may be indicative that it depends on the parasite and host species studied (Wood et al, 2007;Antonini et al, 2019). Shape and height of birds nest may also influence haemosporidian prevalence, nest height must be associated with the spatial feeding preferences of vectors when seeking hosts, while its shape must determine the birds' exposure to vectors (Cerný, Votýpka & Svobodová, 2011;Fecchio et al, 2011;González et al, 2014;Lutz et al, 2015;Matthews et al, 2015).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%