2011
DOI: 10.1590/s1984-46702011000300014 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Luciano D. Queiroz,
Fernando A. Abrunhosa,
Cristiana R. Maciel

Abstract: The appropriate feeding regime for larvae and post-larvae of crustacean decapods is essential for successful larval culture. Reports on the development and morphology of the mouthparts and foregut of these crustaceans have aided in the selection of appropriate larval foodstuffs and consequently increased larval survival and growth rate during development. In the present study, the functional morphology of foregut and mouthparts was investigated in larvae and post-larvae of the freshwater prawn M. amazonicum (H… Show more

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“…There is much information about the decapod digestive tract, particularly concerning to economically important species, such as palinurids, scyllarids and penaeids (Cox and Bruce 2003;Suthers and Anderson 2006;Abrunhosa and Melo 2008). Little information on the mouthparts or alimentary tract of the genus Macrobrachium Bate 1868 and other caridean prawns has been reported in the literature, as an example larvae of M. rosenbergii De Man, 1879 (Abrunhosa and Melo 2002) and M. amazonicum (Heller, 1862) (Queiroz et al 2011) and adults of M. malcolmsonii (Milne Edwards, 1844) (Patwardhan 1935a), M. acanthurus (Wiegmann, 1836) (Felgenhauer and Abele 1989) and M. carcinus (Lima et al 2014).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
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“…There is much information about the decapod digestive tract, particularly concerning to economically important species, such as palinurids, scyllarids and penaeids (Cox and Bruce 2003;Suthers and Anderson 2006;Abrunhosa and Melo 2008). Little information on the mouthparts or alimentary tract of the genus Macrobrachium Bate 1868 and other caridean prawns has been reported in the literature, as an example larvae of M. rosenbergii De Man, 1879 (Abrunhosa and Melo 2002) and M. amazonicum (Heller, 1862) (Queiroz et al 2011) and adults of M. malcolmsonii (Milne Edwards, 1844) (Patwardhan 1935a), M. acanthurus (Wiegmann, 1836) (Felgenhauer and Abele 1989) and M. carcinus (Lima et al 2014).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…Hayd et al (2008) have described the principal molt stages and Anger and Hayd (2009, 2010) studied the ontogenetic changes in early larval feeding and growth. The first‐stage larvae present obligatory lecithotrophy and feeding behavior is initiated after molting to the second stage (Araujo and Valenti 2007; Anger et al 2009; Queiroz et al 2011). The Stage III zoea are zooplanktotrophic (Anger and Hayd 2009).…”
mentioning
“…mobilis'" Comparison of Mandible Development in P. elegans, M. amazonicum, and Other Palaemonids Compared to P. elegans and other Palaemonidae, the zoea I of M. amazonicum shows untypical mandible structures. Its mitten form with small processes was also described by Magalhães and Walker (1988) and Queiroz et al (2011). During the subsequent larval development, the main changes comprise an increase in the size of the gnathal edges and processes and an appearance of additional submarginal setae.…”
Section: Discussion General and Taxon-specific Features Of Mandiblesmentioning
“…This does not mean that appendages on the gnathal edge are absent as they are found in the form of minute precursors of the feeding stages appendages. Figures 1 and 2 in Queiroz et al (2011) show that the mandibular appendages develop after the moult from zoea I (nonfeeding) to zoea II (feeding). This fits well with the results of this study.…”
Section: Discussion General and Taxon-specific Features Of Mandiblesmentioning