2021
DOI: 10.1002/glia.24010 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Some children with proven intrauterine Zika virus (ZIKV) infection who were born asymptomatic subsequently manifested neurodevelopmental delays, pointing to impairment of development perinatally and postnatally. To model this, we infected postnatal day (P) 5–6 (equivalent to the perinatal period in humans) susceptible mice with a mammalian cell‐propagated ZIKV clinical isolate from the Brazilian outbreak in 2015. All infected mice appeared normal up to 4 days post‐intraperitoneal inoculation (dpi), but rapidly… Show more

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“…In a mouse model of intracranial infection at different stages of embryonic development, co-immunoreactivity throughout the brain of cleaved caspase-3 and ZIKV are indicators of deleterious cell death [8]. In a recent study, oligodendrocyte loss in spinal cord and white matter has been linked to neurodevelopmental defects and perinatal ZIKV induced pathogenesis in mice [113].…”
Section: Zika Virus and Apoptosismentioning
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“…In a mouse model of intracranial infection at different stages of embryonic development, co-immunoreactivity throughout the brain of cleaved caspase-3 and ZIKV are indicators of deleterious cell death [8]. In a recent study, oligodendrocyte loss in spinal cord and white matter has been linked to neurodevelopmental defects and perinatal ZIKV induced pathogenesis in mice [113].…”
Section: Zika Virus and Apoptosismentioning
“…While the mechanism for these delayed effects is unclear, murine models suggest that Zika infection of oligodendrocytes and subsequent cell death in the post-natal period leads to secondary immune demyelination. 129 It is also possible that ZIKV has persistent replicating ability in the CNS, which could increase the risk of neurological issues in children with intrauterine Zika exposure. 130 Together, these data present a strong case that clinically normal infants at birth whose mothers had a known Zika infection during pregnancy should be closely followed for the signs of neurodevelopmental delays years after initial diagnosis.…”
Section: Neuroinvasive Zikv Infectionmentioning
“…Although primarily known for their role as being oligodendrocyte precursor cells, adult animals maintain an abundant population of NG2-glia whose functions, aside from being progenitors of oligodendrocytes, remain largely unknown. NG2-glia are shown to react to CNS injury and infection, though participation within the inflammatory milieu can range from being the primary target of infection, such as during persistent infections causing chronic demyelinating disease such as TMEV infection of SJL mice 60 , 61 or Human herpes virus, 62 , 63 or as responders to infection and participants in the overall inflammatory responses and mechanisms of brain protection, such as in ZIKV infection 64 or TMEV infection of C57B/L6J mice in the viral infection–induced model of TLE.…”
Section: Innate Immune Responsementioning