2019
DOI: 10.1590/1980-57642018dn13-020003
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Olfactory impairment in frontotemporal dementia: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Abstract: ABSTRACT. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) presents clinically in three variants: one behavioral and two with progressive primary aphasia - non-fluent/agrammatic and semantic. Defined by the degenerative process and cerebral atrophy, olfactory dysfunction occurs in up to 96% of previous FTD case series. Objective: the present study aims to critically synthesize data about the relationship between FTD and olfactory impairment to analyze the usefulness of olfactory evaluation tests as a complementary element in ea… Show more

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Cited by 11 publications
(8 citation statements)
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References 23 publications
(33 reference statements)
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“…Neuroimaging in sub‐acute COVID‐19 patients also provided evidence of regional involvement of the olfactory bulb and its first‐ and second‐order projections 29–34 . We note too that involvement of the olfactory cortical network in early Alzheimer's disease (AD) is well established, and olfactory dysfunction is a strong clinical correlate of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in AD and other forms of dementia 35–37 …”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 83%
See 2 more Smart Citations
“…Neuroimaging in sub‐acute COVID‐19 patients also provided evidence of regional involvement of the olfactory bulb and its first‐ and second‐order projections 29–34 . We note too that involvement of the olfactory cortical network in early Alzheimer's disease (AD) is well established, and olfactory dysfunction is a strong clinical correlate of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in AD and other forms of dementia 35–37 …”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 83%
“…166,167 Olfactory impairment is also correlated with tau pathology and neuroinflammation in patients with ADRD 168 and predictive of dementia diagnosis in several pathologies. 36,37 As mentioned in the introduction, SARS-CoV-2 invades the olfactory bulb, and this is the likely explanation for the prevalent anosmia in infected patients. [20][21][22][24][25][26][27] This mechanism has been well established in experimental animals 26 and is well supported by imaging studies of sub-acute COVID-19 patients.…”
Section: Focus On Olfactory Impairmentmentioning
confidence: 98%
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“…The olfactory sensory neural pathway includes numerous brain regions implicated in the pathophysiology of a number of developmentally mediated neuropsychiatric disorders 919–944 . Notably, in the past two decades, the literature concerning psychophysical OF and its associated structural brain, physiological, and clinical correlates has exponentially grown, providing crucial insights into the developmental and clinical aspects of these neuropsychiatric disorders.…”
Section: Pathophysiologymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Olfactory tests are necessary tools for adequate assessment of olfactory function [ 1 ]. The use of olfactory assessment tests has become more relevant in recent years, due to clinical and research findings that indicate the existence of olfactory alterations derived from traumatic injuries as brain injury [ 2 , 3 ], in surgical or medical procedures for the treatment of some diseases such as larynx tumors requiring partial or total laryngectomy [ 4 ], treatment with radiotherapy [ 5 ], or pathologies with alterations of the sense of smell such as arterial hypertension [ 6 ], liver disease [ 7 , 8 ], diabetes mellitus [ 9 , 10 ], rhinitis, sinusitis [ 11 , 12 ], autoimmune diseases [ 13 , 14 ], inflammatory diseases [ 15 ], anxiety [ 16 , 17 ], major depression [ 18 , 19 , 20 , 21 ], schizophrenia [ 22 ], autism [ 23 ], and neurodegenerative diseases [ 24 , 25 ], such as frontotemporal dementia [ 26 , 27 , 28 ], amyotrophic lateral sclerosis [ 29 ], Parkinson’s disease [ 30 , 31 , 32 , 33 ], or Alzheimer’s disease [ 33 , 34 , 35 , 36 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%