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Cited by 16 publications
(6 citation statements)
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“…The G band is assigned to aromatic ring breathing and C=C bonds. The D/G intensity ratio (peak height ratio) are in the 0.79-0.89 range, higher than 0.67 obtained for the same biochar prepared under slightly different conditions, at 400 °C under N2/H2 mixture [21], and also higher than 0.58 obtained for Spanish olive stones carbonized at 600 °C [39]. The slightly higher D/G ratio indicates increase in defects.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 71%
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“…The G band is assigned to aromatic ring breathing and C=C bonds. The D/G intensity ratio (peak height ratio) are in the 0.79-0.89 range, higher than 0.67 obtained for the same biochar prepared under slightly different conditions, at 400 °C under N2/H2 mixture [21], and also higher than 0.58 obtained for Spanish olive stones carbonized at 600 °C [39]. The slightly higher D/G ratio indicates increase in defects.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 71%
“…Interestingly, all spectra exhibit doublets characteristic of carbon-based matter. Indeed, two peaks coined D and G, are centred at 13511 and 15765 cm -1 , respectively (Figure 3) [39]. The D band accounts for defects in the biochar chemical structure, for example C-C bonds between aromatic rings [40] as well as C-O defects [39].…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…More recently, Puig-Gamero et al 262 produced activated carbons from OS by single-step activation with steam and CO 2 , in a bench-scale high-pressure thermobalance. Activating conditions were optimised to obtain the highest adsorption capacity.…”
Section: Selectivitymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Currently, materials of natural origin are often used as precursors in the synthesis of carbonaceous materials [ 4 ]. For this purpose are used, e.g., corn cobs [ 5 ], nutshells [ 6 ], pomegranate peels [ 7 ], coconut shells [ 8 ], coir pith [ 9 ], brazilian nutshell [ 10 ], palm fruits shells [ 11 ], oil palm fruits shells [ 12 ], olive stones [ 13 ], jackfruit shell waste and jackfruit peels [ 14 ], rice husk [ 15 ], banana peels [ 16 ], apple pulp [ 17 ], cotton stalk [ 18 ], and egg white biomass [ 19 ]. There are also reports describing biological precursors used in the production of carbonaceous materials [ 20 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%