2009
DOI: 10.1590/s0103-90162009000600014
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Nitrogen availability, leaf life span and nitrogen conservation mechanisms in leaves of tropical trees

Abstract: Evergreen species of temperate regions are dominant in low-nutrient soils. This feature is attributed to more efficient mechanisms of nutrient economy. Nevertheless, the cashew (Anacardium occidentale-Anacardiaceae), a deciduous species, is native to regions in Brazil with sandy soil, whilst the annatto (Bixa orellana-Bixaceae), classified as an evergreen species native to tropical America, grows spontaneously in regions with more humid soils. Evergreens contain robust leaves that can resist adverse conditions… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
1
1

Citation Types

0
4
0

Year Published

2014
2014
2015
2015

Publication Types

Select...
2

Relationship

0
2

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 2 publications
(4 citation statements)
references
References 42 publications
0
4
0
Order By: Relevance
“…Species with longer LLS have lower leaf mass per unit area [6], lower chlorophyll content [31, 12,22], and lower soluble protein [12,36,22]. However, there is no information about the intra-species plasticity of these parameters.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 2 more Smart Citations
“…Species with longer LLS have lower leaf mass per unit area [6], lower chlorophyll content [31, 12,22], and lower soluble protein [12,36,22]. However, there is no information about the intra-species plasticity of these parameters.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…It is generally assumed that a long LLS permits a longer utilization of nutrients in the leaf biomass and this contributes to improving the nutrient use efficiency [13,24,6]. This is partly because a longer duration of leaf biomass can compensate for a smaller instantaneous productivity and thereby may help to increase nutrient use efficiency following longer period of storage of nutrient pools in leaf Leaf longevity is optimized to maximize plant carbon gain and thus determines the productivity of the trees [19].…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…High resorption proficiency implies low concentrations because a low N and P concentration in senesced leaves is the evidence of high proficiency, and vice versa (Yuan et al, 2005, Kilic et al, 2010. Corte et al (2009) stated that low RP indicates higher potential for conserving of a nutrient. V. arctostaphyllos had a higher potential for conserving N and P because it had the lowest mass-and area-based NRP and PRP in undisturbed forest.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%