2016
DOI: 10.1080/17470919.2016.1159605
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Neurobehavioral assessment of maternal odor in developing rat pups: implications for social buffering

Abstract: Social support can attenuate the behavioral and stress hormone response to threat, a phenomenon called social buffering. The mother’s social buffering of the infant is one of the more robust examples; yet we understand little about the neurobiology. Using a rodent model, we explore the neurobiology of social buffering by assessing neural processing of the maternal odor, a major cue controlling social buffering in rat pups. We used pups before (postnatal day (PN) 7) and after (PN14, PN23) the functional emergen… Show more

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Cited by 63 publications
(25 citation statements)
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References 173 publications
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“…Animal models of caregiver nurturance and caregiver-infant synchrony are needed to better understand the mechanism by which these caregiver styles in early life promote optimal emotional development throughout the lifespan. However, insight can be drawn from existing rodent and primate studies related to mother-infant social buffering [23,48], and social learning [49], which provide evidence of strong maternal regulation of emotional states, emotional learning, and the associated underlying physiology in early life.…”
Section: Bodymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Animal models of caregiver nurturance and caregiver-infant synchrony are needed to better understand the mechanism by which these caregiver styles in early life promote optimal emotional development throughout the lifespan. However, insight can be drawn from existing rodent and primate studies related to mother-infant social buffering [23,48], and social learning [49], which provide evidence of strong maternal regulation of emotional states, emotional learning, and the associated underlying physiology in early life.…”
Section: Bodymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Previous work provides some insight into the mechanisms that support this learning in humans. For example, in humans and rodents, the mother’s natural odors and food odors experienced in utero are preferred after birth (Mennella 2014; Cooke & Fildes, 2011; Abate et al, 2008; Mennella et al, 2001; Varendi et al, 1996; Pedersen & Blass, 1982), although lack of subsequent exposure to these odors decrease this preference, and novel postnatal odors (natural, perfume) of the mother and other nonrelated caregivers are quickly learned (Al Ain et al, 2016; Schaal, 2015; Mennella et al, 2011; Schaal et al, 2009; Mennella & Beauchamp, 1999). Indeed, in newly born human infants a few minutes of simply pairing a novel odor with tactile stimulation on the first day of life causes that odor to be preferred but also elicits head turns towards that odor and mouthing (Sullivan et al, 1991).…”
Section: Neurobiology Of Attachment Learning: Odor Learning and Safetymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…It is important to note that none of the tested animals had experience with this type of odor. The odor guides the approach and avoidance behaviors that begin at birth in many mammals, including humans (Al Aïn et al, ; Moriceau & Sullivan, ). Olfactory cues are essential for newborn rodents to approach the mother and attach to the nipples and to suppress the ultrasonic vocalizations in the presence of a predator (Perry et al, ; Takahashi, ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%