2009
DOI: 10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2008.525
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Abstract: Context Social anxiety disorder is thought to involve emotional hyper-reactivity, cognitive distortions, and ineffective emotion regulation. While the neural bases of emotional reactivity to social stimuli have been described, the neural bases of emotional reactivity and cognitive regulation during social and physical threat, and their relationship to social anxiety symptom severity, have yet to be investigated. Objective This study investigated behavioral and neural correlates of emotional reactivity and co… Show more

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Cited by 403 publications
(200 citation statements)
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References 70 publications
(82 reference statements)
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“…Socially anxious individuals and individuals with SAD have been found to use more experiential avoidance and expressive suppression both at the trait level and on a daily basis (e.g., Blalock, Kashdan, & Farmer, 2016;Goldin et al, 2014;Kashdan & Rottenberg, 2010;O'Toole, Jensen, Fentz, Zachariae, & Hougaard, 2014;Werner, Goldin, Ball, Heimberg, & Gross, 2011). These individuals may also use less reappraisal or feel less selfefficacious in the employment of this strategy (e.g., Goldin, Manber, Hakimi, Canli, & Gross, 2009;O'Toole et al, 2014;Werner et al, 2011).…”
Section: Background and Objectivesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Socially anxious individuals and individuals with SAD have been found to use more experiential avoidance and expressive suppression both at the trait level and on a daily basis (e.g., Blalock, Kashdan, & Farmer, 2016;Goldin et al, 2014;Kashdan & Rottenberg, 2010;O'Toole, Jensen, Fentz, Zachariae, & Hougaard, 2014;Werner, Goldin, Ball, Heimberg, & Gross, 2011). These individuals may also use less reappraisal or feel less selfefficacious in the employment of this strategy (e.g., Goldin, Manber, Hakimi, Canli, & Gross, 2009;O'Toole et al, 2014;Werner et al, 2011).…”
Section: Background and Objectivesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This suggests that the amygdala and the fear circuitry may be major players in processing emotional facial expressions, but still, the amygdala works collaboratively, and these studies suggest that amygdala couplings may also differentiate individuals with SAD from healthy controls. Interestingly, hyper-responsiveness to emotional faces differentiates SAD from other anxiety disorders (Blair et al, 2008b), and it has repeatedly been shown that social anxiety symptom severity predicts amygdala responsivity (Evans et al, 2008;Goldin, Manber, Hakimi, Canli, & Gross, 2009a;Phan, Fitzgerald, Nathan, & Tancer, 2006). Furthermore, Goldin et al (2009a) found that the differences between SAD and controls were specific to social threats (i.e., emotional faces) and that the SAD hyper-responsiveness was located in in the parahippocampal gyrus.…”
Section: Reaction Tasksmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…Interestingly, hyper-responsiveness to emotional faces differentiates SAD from other anxiety disorders (Blair et al, 2008b), and it has repeatedly been shown that social anxiety symptom severity predicts amygdala responsivity (Evans et al, 2008;Goldin, Manber, Hakimi, Canli, & Gross, 2009a;Phan, Fitzgerald, Nathan, & Tancer, 2006). Furthermore, Goldin et al (2009a) found that the differences between SAD and controls were specific to social threats (i.e., emotional faces) and that the SAD hyper-responsiveness was located in in the parahippocampal gyrus. Interestingly, they did not find any evidence of between-group differences on instant reactivity to stimuli of nonsocial violent scenarios, suggesting that heightened reactivity in the fear-circuitry frequently reported in SAD may be specific to social threats.…”
Section: Reaction Tasksmentioning
confidence: 97%
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