2014
DOI: 10.1007/s00436-014-4081-8
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Abstract: Tunga is the most specialized genus among the Siphonaptera because adult females penetrate into the skin of their hosts and, after mating and fertilization, undergo hypertrophy, forming an enlarged structure known as the neosome. In humans and other warm-blooded animals, neosomes cause tungiasis, which arises due to the action of opportunistic agents. Although its effects on humans and domestic animals are well described in the literature, little is known about the impact of tungiasis on wild animals. This rev… Show more

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Cited by 39 publications
(31 citation statements)
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“…Tungiasis is a parasitosis of humans and animals caused by embedded female sand fleas belonging to the genus Tunga . So far 14 different Tunga species have been described [ 1 4 ] of which three have been reported in domestic animals: Tunga hexalobulata , Tunga trimamillata and Tunga penetrans [ 3 , 5 ]. Only the latter two species are known to be zoonotic.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Tungiasis is a parasitosis of humans and animals caused by embedded female sand fleas belonging to the genus Tunga . So far 14 different Tunga species have been described [ 1 4 ] of which three have been reported in domestic animals: Tunga hexalobulata , Tunga trimamillata and Tunga penetrans [ 3 , 5 ]. Only the latter two species are known to be zoonotic.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…It is unlikely that finding Bartonella DNA in Hectopsylla sp. would pose a risk to human health, because these fleas are neosomatic and females are semipenetrating (Linardi & Moreira de Avelar, 2014), they stay attached to the host for long periods of time, representing little chance that it will infect humans. The high prevalence of Bartonella DNA reported in this study for X. cheopis (63.6%) would be within the ranges reported for other parts of the world (Billeter et al, 2011: 95%;Leulmi et al, 2014: 34.7%;Klangthong et al, 2015: 25.8%;Billeter et al, 2013: 59.1%;Dieme et al, 2015: 6.7%).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…A review solely on the neosomes of tungid fleas that infest wild and domestic animals and concentrated mainly on hosts, infestation, sites of attachment, and impact on the hosts was recently presented by Linardi and Avelar [ 32 ].…”
Section: Neosomesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Given the epidemiological and economic importance of T. penetrans and T. trimamillata, which infest both domestic animals and humans, the correct identification of species is indispensable. T. penetrans has been found parasitizing at least 28 genera of hosts [ 10 ], although some occurrences are incorrect records [ 32 , 33 ]. Morphological variations must be used carefully for taxonomic purposes.…”
Section: Final Remarksmentioning
confidence: 99%