2021
DOI: 10.1007/s12355-021-01016-z
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Native Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Exhibit Biotechnological Potential in Improvement of Soil Biochemical Quality and in Increasing Yield in Sugarcane Cultivars

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Cited by 8 publications
(4 citation statements)
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“…Qilin) [17] and sugarcane (Saccharum spp. Hybrids) [30]. Meddich et al [29] observed in C. melo that The results obtained in this study demonstrate the effect of AMF with or without salinity stress on colonization percentage and plantlet development and biomass variables.…”
Section: Colonization Percentage Plantlet Development and Biomasssupporting
confidence: 67%
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“…Qilin) [17] and sugarcane (Saccharum spp. Hybrids) [30]. Meddich et al [29] observed in C. melo that The results obtained in this study demonstrate the effect of AMF with or without salinity stress on colonization percentage and plantlet development and biomass variables.…”
Section: Colonization Percentage Plantlet Development and Biomasssupporting
confidence: 67%
“…Wu et al [17] observed in C. lanatus that colonization with mycorrhizae at a dose of 300 spores per plant promoted greater biomass accumulation. Sales et al [30] in Saccharum spp. obtained an increase in yield when inoculating with native AMF at a dose of 260 spores per plant.…”
Section: Colonization Percentage Plantlet Development and Biomassmentioning
confidence: 96%
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“…This process represents an opportunity to inoculate beneficial microorganisms before transplantation into field conditions [ 14 ]. The ecological interactions (commensalism, agonism, amensalism, antagonism, parasitism, and mutualism) between different organisms can be applied in plant and microbial biotechnology, and some of these interactions may be beneficial for all partners involved (mutualistic interactions), whereas others are detrimental for at least one partner (antagonistic interactions) [ 15 , 16 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%