2020
DOI: 10.1111/ahe.12566
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Morphological and scanning electron microscopic study of the lingual papillae in the Javan Pipistrelle (Pipistrellus javanicus)

Abstract: There are vast numbers of bats, in terms of both individuals and species, in Indonesia, although the precise species count is currently unknown. These bats demonstrate great variation in feeding patterns, with some being insectivorous, frugivorous, nectareating or carnivorous. One of the insectivorous bats found on Java Island, Indonesia, is the Javan pipistrelle (Pipistrellus javanicus). This paper presents a detailed morphological description of the tongue and lingual papillae of P. javanicus, using scanning… Show more

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Cited by 3 publications
(2 citation statements)
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“…whether they are carnivores, omnivores or herbivores) as well as their environments and habitats, which may play a partial role in the evolution of the tongue's structure (Iwasaki et al, 2019). Such an adaptation based on diet, environment or habitat has been described in various studies, especially on mammals, such as goats (Mahdy et al, 2020), lemurs (Pastor et al, 2011), pumas (Erdoğan et al, 2017), sugar gliders (Damia et al, 2021) and several other carnivores, including polar bears, marsupials and bats (Emura et al, 2017; Goździewska‐Harłajczuk et al, 2020; Gunawan et al, 2019; Saragih et al, 2020). Tongue morphology revealed a relationship between changes in habitat and changes in the appearance of the tongue; the transition from a freshwater (moist or wet) environment to a terrestrial (dry) environment resulted in the keratinization of the lingual epithelium (Iwasaki, 2002).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…whether they are carnivores, omnivores or herbivores) as well as their environments and habitats, which may play a partial role in the evolution of the tongue's structure (Iwasaki et al, 2019). Such an adaptation based on diet, environment or habitat has been described in various studies, especially on mammals, such as goats (Mahdy et al, 2020), lemurs (Pastor et al, 2011), pumas (Erdoğan et al, 2017), sugar gliders (Damia et al, 2021) and several other carnivores, including polar bears, marsupials and bats (Emura et al, 2017; Goździewska‐Harłajczuk et al, 2020; Gunawan et al, 2019; Saragih et al, 2020). Tongue morphology revealed a relationship between changes in habitat and changes in the appearance of the tongue; the transition from a freshwater (moist or wet) environment to a terrestrial (dry) environment resulted in the keratinization of the lingual epithelium (Iwasaki, 2002).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Before staining, the sections were deparaffinized in xylene and rehydrated in graded ethanol. Some sample slides were stained with haematoxylin–eosin (HE) Saragih et al., 2020), and the others were stained with periodic acid–Schiff (PAS) (Bio‐Optica, Milano). Finally, the sections were mounted with deck glass.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%