1999
DOI: 10.1091/mbc.10.10.3125
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Abstract: The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a limited life-span, which is measured by the number of divisions that individual cells complete. Among the many changes that occur as yeasts age are alterations in chromatin-dependent transcriptional silencing. We have genetically manipulated histone deacetylases to modify chromatin, and we have examined the effect on yeast longevity. Deletion of the histone deacetylase gene RPD3 extended life-span. Its effects on chromatin functional state were evidenced by enhanced sil… Show more

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Cited by 199 publications
(180 citation statements)
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“…We observed both induction and repression of transcription by PBA. It is interesting to note that overexpression of Sir2 protein in both yeast (26) and C. elegans (40), which has NAD-dependent histone deacetylase activity, is implicated in silencing of gene transcription, associated with extension of the lifespan, whereas deletion of a different histone deacetylase (RPD3) also extends lifespan (27). This conundrum suggests that the underlying mechanism for the extension of lifespan may be an optimal balance of expression and repression of various genes to regulate an optimal physiological and cellular environment for longevity.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…We observed both induction and repression of transcription by PBA. It is interesting to note that overexpression of Sir2 protein in both yeast (26) and C. elegans (40), which has NAD-dependent histone deacetylase activity, is implicated in silencing of gene transcription, associated with extension of the lifespan, whereas deletion of a different histone deacetylase (RPD3) also extends lifespan (27). This conundrum suggests that the underlying mechanism for the extension of lifespan may be an optimal balance of expression and repression of various genes to regulate an optimal physiological and cellular environment for longevity.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The rDNA is associated with yeast aging (Kennedy et al 1997;Sinclair and Guarente 1997;Kim et al 1999a;Benguria et al 2003). RAD52-dependent recom- old yeast cells (Sinclair and Guarente 1997).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…To generate the fob1 this theory, however. Furthermore, recent data have deletion strains, an EcoRI-BamHI fragment of plasmid pCB6, revealed that accumulation of ERCs is not an obligatory which contains the kanamycin gene flanked by the 5Ј-region feature but rather parallels aging (Ashrafi et al 1999; (Ϫ592 to Ϫ34) and the 3Ј-region (ϩ1707 to ϩ1893) of the Heo et al 1999;Kim et al 1999a).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Analysis of Replicative Life Span in Yeast-The replicative life span was analyzed as described previously (27). In summary, new buds (virgin cells) from overnight cultures were deposited in a row in isolated spots on an YPD plate.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Yeast cultures were grown for 4 -5 days until they reach a stationary phase in 10 ml of YPD media. Then, the cells were washed twice, and an equal number of cells were re-suspended in 10 ml of sterile distilled water, and their growth was monitored on YPD plates after serial dilutions.Analysis of Replicative Life Span in Yeast-The replicative life span was analyzed as described previously (27). In summary, new buds (virgin cells) from overnight cultures were deposited in a row in isolated spots on an YPD plate.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%