2021
DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2021.740921
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Modeling Marsh Dynamics Using a 3-D Coupled Wave-Flow-Sediment Model

Abstract: Salt marshes are dynamic biogeomorphic systems that respond to external physical factors, including tides, sediment transport, and waves, as well as internal processes such as autochthonous soil formation. Predicting the fate of marshes requires a modeling framework that accounts for these processes in a coupled fashion. In this study, we implement two new marsh dynamic processes in the 3-D COAWST (coupled-ocean-atmosphere-wave sediment transport) model. The processes added are the erosion of the marsh edge sc… Show more

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Cited by 12 publications
(12 citation statements)
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References 96 publications
(119 reference statements)
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“…This can create potential hotspots for biodiversity (Elsey-Quirk et al, 2019) and determine changes in vegetation distribution according to the ability of individual species to tolerate such stresses, which in turn depends on the specific vegetation traits (Leonard and Croft, 2006;Van Wesenbeeck et al, 2008;Schoutens et al, 2020;Schulte Ostermann et al, 2021). On the one hand, some of the abiotic factors, especially the hydrodynamic ones, could be included rather easily in the model, for example by weighting the habitat quality based on stresses calculated from hydrodynamic models or, alternatively, as a function of the distance of each site from marsh edges exposed to the action of waves and currents (see for example Gourgue et al, 2021a;Kalra et al, 2021). On the other hand, however, most of the biotic factors affecting vegetation dynamics are difficult to conceptualize, as they depend on the community ecology of marsh fauna (Gaskins et al, 2020;Burdick et al, 2021;Pennings and He, 2021).…”
Section: Model Limitations and Future Developmentsmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…This can create potential hotspots for biodiversity (Elsey-Quirk et al, 2019) and determine changes in vegetation distribution according to the ability of individual species to tolerate such stresses, which in turn depends on the specific vegetation traits (Leonard and Croft, 2006;Van Wesenbeeck et al, 2008;Schoutens et al, 2020;Schulte Ostermann et al, 2021). On the one hand, some of the abiotic factors, especially the hydrodynamic ones, could be included rather easily in the model, for example by weighting the habitat quality based on stresses calculated from hydrodynamic models or, alternatively, as a function of the distance of each site from marsh edges exposed to the action of waves and currents (see for example Gourgue et al, 2021a;Kalra et al, 2021). On the other hand, however, most of the biotic factors affecting vegetation dynamics are difficult to conceptualize, as they depend on the community ecology of marsh fauna (Gaskins et al, 2020;Burdick et al, 2021;Pennings and He, 2021).…”
Section: Model Limitations and Future Developmentsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Our model can be coupled with virtually any hydromorphodynamic model to simulate the intertwined evolution of marsh halophytes and topographic gradients under varying rates of relative sea-level rise and sediment supply. If the models employ different types of grids or spatial resolutions, the coupling can also be performed using subgrid schemes together with appropriate multiscale coupling techniques (e.g., Gourgue et al, 2021a;Gourgue et al, 2021b;Kalra et al, 2021). The evolution of marsh topography at each site will be obtained by a combined geomorphological balance between erosion and sedimentation, computed by the morphodynamic model, and organic production by halophytic vegetation, calculated by the vegetation model.…”
Section: Model Limitations and Future Developmentsmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Details on model coupling can be found in Warner et al (2010). For the application presented in this work, we adopted the sediment transport and marsh routines presented in Kalra et al (2021). Updated model framework can be found in supplemental materials (Figure S5 in Supporting Information S1)…”
Section: Model Description For Marsh Developmentmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In this work, we use a coupled vegetation‐hydrodynamic‐morphological model to study the development of a marsh via vegetation colonization and its relationship with forcing conditions. The Coupled‐Ocean‐Atmosphere‐Wave‐Sediment Transport (COAWST) Modeling System (Warner et al., 2010) is used, with a newly developed vegetation module (Kalra et al., 2021). We were able to simulate marsh development in an idealized basin and monitor sediment fluxes and feedbacks with vegetation through a varying range of sediment, SLR, and tidal conditions.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%