2018
DOI: 10.1042/bst20170501
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Mitochondrial abnormalities in Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease: can mitochondria be targeted therapeutically?

Abstract: Mitochondrial abnormalities have been identified as a central mechanism in multiple neurodegenerative diseases and, therefore, the mitochondria have been explored as a therapeutic target. This review will focus on the evidence for mitochondrial abnormalities in the two most common neurodegenerative diseases, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. In addition, we discuss the main strategies which have been explored in these diseases to target the mitochondria for therapeutic purposes, focusing on mitochon… Show more

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Cited by 160 publications
(117 citation statements)
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References 206 publications
(259 reference statements)
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“…Previous studies have shown an increase in ROS in some PRKN mutant patient neurons but not in others and have measured total cellular ROS rather than mitochondrial specific ROS which could explain why the data we present here is more consistent across the group of patients. Targeting mitochondrial dysfunction for a potential therapeutic to slow or stop disease progression is an attractive option with many mitochondrial targeted therapeutics shown to be effective in various models of PD (recently reviewed 2,46 ). Different therapeutic strategies are being developed; some primarily acting to boost energy deficits whilst others are targeting ROS production.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Previous studies have shown an increase in ROS in some PRKN mutant patient neurons but not in others and have measured total cellular ROS rather than mitochondrial specific ROS which could explain why the data we present here is more consistent across the group of patients. Targeting mitochondrial dysfunction for a potential therapeutic to slow or stop disease progression is an attractive option with many mitochondrial targeted therapeutics shown to be effective in various models of PD (recently reviewed 2,46 ). Different therapeutic strategies are being developed; some primarily acting to boost energy deficits whilst others are targeting ROS production.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Parkin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase and functions in the mitophagy pathway 1 . Mitochondrial dysfunction is well established in both familial and sporadic forms of PD (recently reviewed 2 ). Mitochondrial abnormalities are present in both PRKN null Drosophila 3 and mice 4 .…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…85,86 and the effects appear to be driven by increased neuronal apoptosis. 85 Given the well-established role of mitochondrial dysfunction in AD (reviewed in [87][88][89] [91][92][93] Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), 94 and intellectual disabilities 95 through multiple protein function and regulatory mechanisms. It is downregulated in the hippocampus of AD patients, possibly through increased expression of the transcription factor Storkhead box 1A.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Several compounds that target the mitochondrial alterations found in AD such as Mito Q, Skulachev (SkQ1), melatonin, and Sezto-Shiller (SS) tetrapeptide SS31 reduce the neurodegenerative characteristics of mouse models of this disorder and are good candidates to be tested in clinical trials [383].…”
Section: Therapies Targeting Different Pathways Implicated In Ad Pathmentioning
confidence: 99%