2011
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1010481108
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Membrane tension regulates motility by controlling lamellipodium organization

Abstract: Many cell movements proceed via a crawling mechanism, where polymerization of the cytoskeletal protein actin pushes out the leading edge membrane. In this model, membrane tension has been seen as an impediment to filament growth and cell motility. Here we use a simple model of cell motility, the Caenorhabditis elegans sperm cell, to test how membrane tension affects movement and cytoskeleton dynamics. To enable these analyses, we create transgenic worm strains carrying sperm with a fluorescently labeled cytosk… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
1
1
1
1

Citation Types

9
112
0

Year Published

2012
2012
2022
2022

Publication Types

Select...
7
1
1

Relationship

1
8

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 130 publications
(121 citation statements)
references
References 25 publications
9
112
0
Order By: Relevance
“…For example, activation of signaling pathways in cells and cytoskeletal remodeling observed after incubation of cells with MbCD-Chol (6,7,38,39) are likely triggered by the non-specific increase in the membrane area, and thus a decrease in membrane tension, rather than by cholesterol itself. This suggestion is supported by recent studies that demonstrate the strong interplay between the membrane tension and the remodeling of the cell membrane and cytoskeleton (36,40,41). Finally, our work shows that MbCD-Chol should be used with caution as a cholesterol donor in cell and synthetic membrane studies, as the cyclodextrin may also extract a significant amount of phospholipids, thus inducing a variety of unexpected membrane responses, the mechanisms of which would require further investigation.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 66%
“…For example, activation of signaling pathways in cells and cytoskeletal remodeling observed after incubation of cells with MbCD-Chol (6,7,38,39) are likely triggered by the non-specific increase in the membrane area, and thus a decrease in membrane tension, rather than by cholesterol itself. This suggestion is supported by recent studies that demonstrate the strong interplay between the membrane tension and the remodeling of the cell membrane and cytoskeleton (36,40,41). Finally, our work shows that MbCD-Chol should be used with caution as a cholesterol donor in cell and synthetic membrane studies, as the cyclodextrin may also extract a significant amount of phospholipids, thus inducing a variety of unexpected membrane responses, the mechanisms of which would require further investigation.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 66%
“…1A and Movie S2). The only method to date to artificially increase membrane tension is to subject cells to hypotonic stress (12,13,23,24). Whereas it is not possible to totally exclude side effects on other signaling pathways, we did observe that replacing media with hypotonic solution at half tonicity clearly induced an increase in membrane tension in macrophages (Fig.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…4C,bottom) proposes that chemoattractants simply bias the dynamic and self-organising autocatalytic nature of protrusions towards the gradient without the need of a compass (Arrieumerlou and Meyer, 2005;Insall, 2010). As such, this model seems to better integrate recent data showing that membrane tension resulting from actin polymerisation acts as a longrange physical signal that inhibits protrusion formation in regions other than the cell front (Batchelder et al, 2011;Houk et al, 2012). Although the compass and chemotactic bias models may differ in some aspects, it should be noted that they are not mutually exclusive and thus both probably operate in most eukaryotic cells (Insall, 2013).…”
Section: Directed Cell Migration Via Chemotaxismentioning
confidence: 96%