2000
DOI: 10.1002/(sici)1097-0274(200001)37:1<6::aid-ajim3>3.3.co;2-8
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Medical examination for asbestos‐related disease

Abstract: There are millions of workers whose exposure to asbestos dust prior to the implementation of asbestos regulation and improved control measures places them at risk of asbestos-related disease today. In addition, workers are still being exposed to signi®cant amounts of asbestos, when asbestos materials in place are disturbed during renovation, repair, or demolition. Given the continued presence of asbestos-containing materials in industrial, commercial, and residential settings throughout the U.S., a sizeable po… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
1
1
1

Citation Types

1
6
0
2

Year Published

2003
2003
2018
2018

Publication Types

Select...
7

Relationship

0
7

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 8 publications
(9 citation statements)
references
References 67 publications
(80 reference statements)
1
6
0
2
Order By: Relevance
“…The procedures used by the local OHSs were inhomogeneous and without coordination in areas characterized by the same health administration. Similar experiences were also described in other countries (8)(9)(10)(11).…”
Section: Introductionsupporting
confidence: 83%
“…The procedures used by the local OHSs were inhomogeneous and without coordination in areas characterized by the same health administration. Similar experiences were also described in other countries (8)(9)(10)(11).…”
Section: Introductionsupporting
confidence: 83%
“…Pleural changes are the most common sequelae of asbestos exposure (18)(19)(20), most commonly appearing 20 to 30 years after initial exposure (18,19,21,22). Pathologically, localized pleural changes or pleural plaques appear as a ''basket weave'' pattern of acellular hyalinized collagen involving the parietal pleura (21).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Although the P-A view is recommended by the ILO's guidelines for the classification of radiographs (ILO 1980), we used the lateral right and left oblique views as well as the P-A view for evaluating abnormalities. The addition of right and left oblique views increases the precision and the sensitivity and specificity of chest radiographs in finding pleural abnormalities not evident on the P-A view alone (Lawson et al 2001;Levin et al 2000).…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%