2018
DOI: 10.25091/s01013300201800010001
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Mapeando o Supremo: as posições dos ministros do STF na jurisdição constitucional (2012-2017)

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Cited by 17 publications
(9 citation statements)
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“…Accounting for ideology in the Brazilian context, however, is not a simple task, considering existing scholarship. While we do have relevant findings concerning ideal points in the STF, there is no conventional, accepted measurement of ideology for individual judges in the existing literature, and explanations of the role of ideology in forming these voting coalitions are still tentative and limited in many respects (e.g., Martins, 2018;Oliveira, et al, 2022;Silva, 2018). Still, the appointing president (or his or her political party) is used in some studies as a proxy for investigating judicial ideology or ideological voting coalitions (e.g., Araújo, 2017;Desposato et al, 2015;Oliveira, 2012aOliveira, , 2012b.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 95%
“…Accounting for ideology in the Brazilian context, however, is not a simple task, considering existing scholarship. While we do have relevant findings concerning ideal points in the STF, there is no conventional, accepted measurement of ideology for individual judges in the existing literature, and explanations of the role of ideology in forming these voting coalitions are still tentative and limited in many respects (e.g., Martins, 2018;Oliveira, et al, 2022;Silva, 2018). Still, the appointing president (or his or her political party) is used in some studies as a proxy for investigating judicial ideology or ideological voting coalitions (e.g., Araújo, 2017;Desposato et al, 2015;Oliveira, 2012aOliveira, , 2012b.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 95%
“…At this very point, we begin to connect the two ends of our argument: sub-proletariat and evangelicals. As is known, although they have changed significantly in recent decades from the socioeconomic point of view, the evangelical group, even the LEC, is still composed mostly of people with lower education; who declare themselves as black and brown, residents in the outskirts of large cities and occupying the service sector (Bohn 2004) and that traditionally composed the electoral base of the right (Pierucci 1989;Mariano & Pierucci 1992). These segments, however, gradually migrated to the Lulist base, first by having their leaders admitted to the PT government, then by seeing themselves incorporated in what we call ʺcitizenship for consumptionʺ (Author 2019).…”
Section: Resentfulness As a Primordial Affectionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In addition to its capacity to leverage cultural patterns, based on the preaching of standards of morality and rules for individual conduct, its electoral expression is evident year after year. Pastoral and legislative leaders of the evangelical right have been studied at least since the 1980s, when they formed the evangelical bloc in the Constituent Assembly (1987)(1988), and N supported the conservative candidate Collor de Mello in the 1989 general elections (MARIANO and PIERUCCI, 1992;PIERUCCI, 1989). Guided by corporatist interests and strong moral conservatism, this bloc has expanded in the last two decades.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%