2012
DOI: 10.1071/wr11196
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Long-term effects of immunocontraception on wild boar fertility, physiology and behaviour

Abstract: Context. Fertility control appears as a publicly acceptable alternative to lethal methods for limiting population growth in wildlife. Recently developed single-dose immunocontraceptive vaccines have induced infertility in several mammals. However, the potential side-effects and the long-term effectiveness of these contraceptives have been poorly investigated.Aims. We tested the long-term effectiveness and potential side-effects of the single-dose gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) vaccine GonaConÔ on capti… Show more

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Cited by 39 publications
(50 citation statements)
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“…We confirmed that free-living wild boar responded to GonaConÔ by producing GnRH antibodies at levels that are known to be associated with infertility in captive wild boar and feral pigs (Miller et al 2003;Killian et al 2006;Massei et al 2008Massei et al , 2012. It also appeared that, as previously found in bison (Miller et al 2004), GonaConÔ vaccination did not affect existing pregnancy.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 73%
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“…We confirmed that free-living wild boar responded to GonaConÔ by producing GnRH antibodies at levels that are known to be associated with infertility in captive wild boar and feral pigs (Miller et al 2003;Killian et al 2006;Massei et al 2008Massei et al , 2012. It also appeared that, as previously found in bison (Miller et al 2004), GonaConÔ vaccination did not affect existing pregnancy.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 73%
“…Efficacy of a similar treatment in captive mares (Equus caballus) declined from 94% to 40% over 4 years, (Killian et al 2008b), and efficacy was lower for feral mares taken from the same population ), although fertility rates of treated animals were still significantly lower than those of controls. Compared with the results obtained with captive wild boar animals, where some sows were rendered infertile for at least 6 years, infertility in the treated free-living animals might not have lasted as long; titres in female F15 had dropped to 1 : 32 000 after 18 months, a level that in captive wild boar was associated with returning fertility (Massei et al 2012). The declining pattern of antibody titres observed in that animal suggested that infertility much beyond 72 weeks would have been unlikely, although in captive wild boar, antibody titres declined over the first 12-24 months post-injection, then remained at a sufficient (low) level to block reproduction for several years (Massei et al 2012).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 98%
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