2010
DOI: 10.3897/biorisk.4.50
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Lepidoptera. Chapter 11

Abstract: We provide a comprehensive overview of those Lepidopteran invasions to Europe that result from increasing globalisation and also review expansion of species within Europe. A total of 97 non-native Lepidoptera species (about 1% of the known fauna), in 20 families and 11 superfamilies have established so far in

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
3

Citation Types

0
28
0
1

Year Published

2013
2013
2024
2024

Publication Types

Select...
3
3
2

Relationship

1
7

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 49 publications
(29 citation statements)
references
References 19 publications
0
28
0
1
Order By: Relevance
“…These moths have been largely understudied, even though many species are serious pests of agricultural and ornamental plants (Lopez‐Vaamonde et al . ). Research on gracillariid systematics has been conducted mainly in Europe (Bengtsson & Johansson ), Asia (Kumata ), and North America (Davis & Deschka ), although recent efforts initiated further documentation of these moths in the Afrotropical (De Prins et al .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…These moths have been largely understudied, even though many species are serious pests of agricultural and ornamental plants (Lopez‐Vaamonde et al . ). Research on gracillariid systematics has been conducted mainly in Europe (Bengtsson & Johansson ), Asia (Kumata ), and North America (Davis & Deschka ), although recent efforts initiated further documentation of these moths in the Afrotropical (De Prins et al .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…The predatory Harlequin ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis, has invaded most of Europe since its discovery in 1991 in Belgium (Brown et al 2011 ). Several species associated with palm trees, such as the palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and the palm moth, Paysandisia archon (Lepidoptera: Castniidae), have also expanded their ranges rapidly across the Mediterranean Basin since the early 2000s (Sauvard et al 2010 ;Lopez-Vaamonde et al 2010 ), as did the gall makers, Ophelimus maskelli and Leptocybe invasa (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) , and the psyllids, Acizzia jamatonica and Glycaspis brimblecombei (Hemiptera: Psyllidae; Mifsud et al 2010 ;Bella and Rapisarda 2013 ) associated with Eucalyptus. In contrast, for unknown reasons some species have not spread at all since their establishment, despite apparently favourable conditions.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In Europe, G. molesta was first recorded in Slovenia in 1920 [10], in southeastern France and much of north-central Italy in the early 1920s [11], and has since dispersed throughout eastern, southern and western Europe, where stone fruit trees are grown. It is commonly assumed that the species was introduced to North America via a fruit shipment to Washington D.C. from Japan around 1913 [12], however this assumption is based on the anecdotal report of a single G. molesta specimen recovered from a shipment of Japanese pears [12].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%