2005
DOI: 10.1111/j.1525-142x.2005.05012.x
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Abstract: Summary The color patterns on the wings of lepidopterans are among the most striking patterns in nature and have inspired diverse biological hypotheses such as the ecological role of aposomatic coloration, the evolution of mimicry, the role of human activities in industrial melanism, and the developmental basis of phenotypic plasticity. Yet, the developmental mechanisms underlying color pattern development are not well understood for three reasons. First, few mutations that alter color patterns have been… Show more

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Cited by 34 publications
(39 citation statements)
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References 75 publications
(107 reference statements)
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“…The higher efficiency of DCR2 than AGO2 inhibition of viral replication in SBPH or WBPH cells coincides with the major role of DCR2 in mediating the restriction of arbovirus replication in insect vectors (44). This phenomenon may be explained by the involvement of DCR2 and AGO2 in different steps during the siRNA antiviral response (12,(44)(45)(46)(47).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 93%
“…Genes encoded on the Z chromosome of Lepidoptera are involved in the differentiation of ecotypes and speciation (Hagen and Scriber 1989;Sperling 1994;Jiggins et al 2001a, b), but the isolation of genes or chromosome regions regulating these traits is hindered in part by the absence of a dense genetic linkage map for each species (Marcus 2005). To partially address these shortfalls, we created a genetic linkage map for the O. nubilalis Z chromosome that was based on gene orthologs that can be identified across multiple species of Lepidoptera.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Junonia species have been widely used to study the evolution and development of butterfly wing colour patterns [2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9]. Experimental tools to manipulate gene expression developed in Junonia are broadly applicable across the Lepidoptera [10][11][12][13][14].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Buckeye butterflies, genus Junonia (Nymphalidae), are an important model system for experimental research in the Lepidoptera [1,2]. Junonia species have been widely used to study the evolution and development of butterfly wing colour patterns [2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Recently, we implemented a model for color pattern development that combined gene expression data from developing wings with computational algorithms that until that point had only been used to model generalized mechanisms of pattern development in butterflies (Evans and Marcus, 2006). This computational approach revealed that a previously proposed hypothesis for the genetic regulatory network underlying eyespot development (Marcus, 2005) was flawed, but revealed two alternative networks that were capable of producing all of the gene expression patterns known from wild-type pre-pupal butterfly eyespots ( Fig. 1; Evans and Marcus, 2006).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%