2020
DOI: 10.3168/jds.2020-18960
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Abstract: The importance of starter cultures to cheese manufacture and ripening is well known. Starters are inoculated into cheese milk at a level of ~10 6 cfu/mL either from a bulk culture or using commercial direct-to-vat cultures. Before ripening, starters grow in the milk to reach populations of 10 7 to 10 9 cfu/g of curd depending on processing variables such as cook temperature, inclusion of washing steps, degree of partitioning with curds and whey, and importantly salt addition rate. Inherent strain-related prope… Show more

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Cited by 30 publications
(13 citation statements)
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“…The back-slopping technique has been traditionally used for the production of artisanal cheese products, requiring the inoculation of milk with natural milk or whey cultures consisting of unknown strains, termed as undefined starters [55]. Nowadays, starters consist of a specific cocktail of well-defined strains [55], as their survival and spatial distribution within the cheese matrix are strain-dependent properties and can determine the final populations in the curd [56]. [58,59].…”
Section: The Cheese Microbial Poolmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The back-slopping technique has been traditionally used for the production of artisanal cheese products, requiring the inoculation of milk with natural milk or whey cultures consisting of unknown strains, termed as undefined starters [55]. Nowadays, starters consist of a specific cocktail of well-defined strains [55], as their survival and spatial distribution within the cheese matrix are strain-dependent properties and can determine the final populations in the curd [56]. [58,59].…”
Section: The Cheese Microbial Poolmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In the early cheese-making process, organic acids produced by lactic acid bacteria from the catabolism of carbohydrates (mainly lactose) contribute to milk coagulation. During cheese ripening, lactic acid bacteria release intracellular enzymes responsible for the hydrolysis of proteins and lipids, thus leading to the production of volatile and nonvolatile flavor compounds (Wilkinson & LaPointe, 2020).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, an unnoticed dramatic change occurred with the introduction of pasteurization and refrigeration of milk, which preserved milk's bioactive exosomal miRs [132][133][134][135], allowing them to enter the human food chain in large-scale [170,171]. Pasteurization thus preserves milk's bioactive mTORC1 activators including galactose, essential amino acids, and exosomal miRs [132,135,145,160,198,527], whereas fermentation degrades galactose [536][537][538][539], essential branched-chain amino acids [540,541], MEX and their miRs, respectively [393]. Whereas addition of milk to a meal increases postprandial insulin levels [542], addition of yogurt reduces postprandial insulinemia [53], thus reduces insulin-mediated mTORC1 signaling.…”
Section: Fermentation All-cause Mortality and Agingmentioning
confidence: 99%