2018
DOI: 10.1016/j.lwt.2017.10.032
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Inulin, hi-maize, and trehalose as thermal protectants for increasing viability of Lactobacillus acidophilus encapsulated by spray drying

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Cited by 112 publications
(42 citation statements)
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“…Besides, slower bacterial metabolism produced less waste, and chemical reactions that were harmful to bacteria were also limited (Chen et al, 2017). A similar study used trehalose as the protective agent, the viable counts of the L. acidophilus was 8.31±0.08 Log CFU/g after storing for 120 days at -18℃ (Nunes et al, 2018). In this study, under low-temperature storage conditions, the protective agent composed of WPC, pullulan, trehalose, and sodium glutamate could protect L.…”
Section: Stability Of L Plantarum Starter During Storagementioning
confidence: 63%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Besides, slower bacterial metabolism produced less waste, and chemical reactions that were harmful to bacteria were also limited (Chen et al, 2017). A similar study used trehalose as the protective agent, the viable counts of the L. acidophilus was 8.31±0.08 Log CFU/g after storing for 120 days at -18℃ (Nunes et al, 2018). In this study, under low-temperature storage conditions, the protective agent composed of WPC, pullulan, trehalose, and sodium glutamate could protect L.…”
Section: Stability Of L Plantarum Starter During Storagementioning
confidence: 63%
“…40, 7.96, 8.73 Log CFU/g (Guergoletto et al, 2017). L. acidophilus La-5 was spray-dried with trehalose as a protective agent, and the viable counts was 11.04±0.07 Log CFU/g (Nunes et al, 2018). When used maltodextrin and trehalose as the protective agent, the survival rate of L. plantarum was 57.70% after spray drying (Lapsiri et al, 2012).…”
Section: Optimization Of Spray-drying Parametersmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…As such, the food industry is interested in stabilization technologies for the preservation of the functional properties of bioactive materials during processing and storage, in modifying the physical properties of bioactive compounds to allow easier handling, in designing the release at the desired time and to specific targets, and in the increase of their bioavailability [5][6][7]. A large variety of works have been reported in the literature regarding the microencapsulation of natural bioactive compounds such as antioxidants present in aqueous extracts (e.g., phenolic compounds [11][12][13][14][15], carotenoids [16][17][18][19][20][21]), organic extracts, or essential oils [22,23], as well as living cells [24][25][26][27][28]. Microcapsules produced for the purpose of incorporation into food products must be formed by a food-grade wall material, and edible polymers such as maltodextrin, inulin, arabic gum, and starch, among others, have emerged as candidates [29].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, probiotic microorganisms are usually sensitive to heat. High temperatures in spray drying can cause microbial cell damage (Nunes et al, 2017). Thus, in order to prevent these damages, the thermal protectants were required to protect starter culture.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Thus, in order to prevent these damages, the thermal protectants were required to protect starter culture. Several types of protection for probiotics have been studied, trehalose has the best thermal protective potential (Nunes et al, 2017). Mandal et al (2006) embedded Lactobacillus casei NCDC-29 in different concentrations of 10.2478/aucft-2019-0001 1 Corresponding author.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%