2000
DOI: 10.1016/s0006-3207(99)00170-6
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Influence of exploitation on population structure, spatial distribution and reproductive success of dioecious species in a fragmented cloud forest in India

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Cited by 67 publications
(40 citation statements)
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“…Systematic surveys of tree species were conducted. The nomenclature and botanical identity of the trees follows Witt (1916), Haines (1916), and Roy et al (1992). Nested plot sampling was used to collect information on the forest structure and composition following Misra (1968).…”
Section: Forest Structure and Compositionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Systematic surveys of tree species were conducted. The nomenclature and botanical identity of the trees follows Witt (1916), Haines (1916), and Roy et al (1992). Nested plot sampling was used to collect information on the forest structure and composition following Misra (1968).…”
Section: Forest Structure and Compositionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Although inbreeding is avoided, sexual reproduction requires a vector to transfer pollen between conspecifics. This dependence entails different risks associated with various pollination mechanisms: animal-pollinated species are bound by the ecological constraints of the foraging distance and the availability of pollinators (Somanathan & Borges 2000), while wind-pollinated systems are subject to factors such as impaction (on vegetation), precipitation and thermal processes (DiGiovanni & Kevan 1991). Each of these risks potentially affects female fecundity in dioecious populations.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Many of the studies examining the effect of forest fragmentation on pollinators and reproductive success of plants have worked with herbaceous plants and most of them have been conducted in grasslands, woodlands and shrublands in temperate or subtropical zones (Sih and Baltus 1987;Spears 1987;Jennersten 1988;Aizen and Feinsinger 1994;Ghazoul et al 1998;Steffan-Dewenter and Tscharntke 1999;Cunningham 2000aCunningham , 2000bSomanathan and Borges 2000;Steffan-Dewenter et al 2001;Donaldson et al 2002;Murren 2002). Moreover, the great majority of studies looked at insect-pollinated plants.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%