2016
DOI: 10.1097/wnr.0000000000000594
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Abstract: Patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) experience a wide array of cognitive deficits, which typically include the impairment of explicit memory. In previous studies, the authors reported that a flavonoid, quercetin, reduces the expression of ATF4 and delays memory deterioration in an early-stage AD mouse model. In the present study, the effects of long-term quercetin intake on memory recall were assessed using contextual fear conditioning in aged wild-type mice. In addition, the present study examined whether … Show more

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Cited by 30 publications
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“…The cardinal hallmarks of AD mainly include amyloid beta senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) composed of hyperphosphorylated tau in the brain (Lane, Hardy, & Schott, ). Until now, the exact causal factors of AD remain not completely explored, while existing evidence suggest that dietary elements might be one of the key factors beneficially or adversely affecting AD progression (Dohrmann et al, ; Nakagawa et al, ; Perrone & Grant, ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…The cardinal hallmarks of AD mainly include amyloid beta senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) composed of hyperphosphorylated tau in the brain (Lane, Hardy, & Schott, ). Until now, the exact causal factors of AD remain not completely explored, while existing evidence suggest that dietary elements might be one of the key factors beneficially or adversely affecting AD progression (Dohrmann et al, ; Nakagawa et al, ; Perrone & Grant, ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Various plant extracts such as apigenin and luteolin have been reported to exhibit possible anti‐AD activity in multiple preclinical and clinical trials (Dey, Bhattacharya, Mukherjee, & Pandey, ). Among these, quercetin (Q) is a flavonoid widely distributed in various plant foods, and has been reported to exhibit neuroprotective effects against AD in both AD patients (Nakagawa et al, ) and different mouse models of AD (Lu, Liu, & Yu, ; Lv et al, ). Meanwhile, recent evidence also reported a synergistic effect of quercetin and α‐lipoic acid in protecting against aluminum chloride‐induced neurotoxicity in rats (Al‐Otaibi, Arafah, Sharma, Alhomida, & Siddiqi, ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Quercetin (80 and 100 mg/kg, i.p, 21 days) enhanced spatial learning and memory impairment in STZ‐induced AD rats (Ashrafpour, Parsaei, & Sepehri, ). Quercetin improved memory recall in aged C57BL/6J mice that were fed a diet containing 0.5% quercetin for 4 weeks (Nakagawa et al., ). In animal studies involving STZ‐induced diabetic rats, quercetin improved memory impairment.…”
Section: Quercetin and Memorymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…humans (232). However, other clinical trials failed to report beneficial effects of quercetin on cognitive function (233).…”
Section: Potential Mediators Of Xbp1 Signaling In Neuronsmentioning
confidence: 99%