2013
DOI: 10.1590/0074-0276130395
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

History of domestication and spread of Aedes aegypti - A Review

Abstract: The adaptation of insect vectors of human diseases to breed in human habitats (domestication) is one of the most important phenomena in medical entomology. Considerable data are available on the vector mosquito Aedes aegypti in this regard and here we integrate the available information including genetics, behaviour, morphology, ecology and biogeography of the mosquito, with human history. We emphasise the tremendous amount of variation possessed by Ae. aegypti for virtually all traits considered. Typological … Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
1
1
1

Citation Types

9
452
2
21

Year Published

2015
2015
2021
2021

Publication Types

Select...
8
1

Relationship

0
9

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 471 publications
(485 citation statements)
references
References 34 publications
9
452
2
21
Order By: Relevance
“…In its native range in Africa, A. aegypti is recognized as occurring in 2 forms, a feral morph sometimes recognized as subspecies formosus, and a domesticated form, subspecies aegypti [4]. Globally widespread by shipping in previous centuries [5], the majority of successful invasive establishments of A. aegypti, especially in tropical regions of Asia and the Americas, are genetically more closely related to the domestic morph [6], with accompanying adaptations such as preferences for human blood and occupancy of man-made containers in their immature stages [4].…”
Section: Attributes Of Invasivenessmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…In its native range in Africa, A. aegypti is recognized as occurring in 2 forms, a feral morph sometimes recognized as subspecies formosus, and a domesticated form, subspecies aegypti [4]. Globally widespread by shipping in previous centuries [5], the majority of successful invasive establishments of A. aegypti, especially in tropical regions of Asia and the Americas, are genetically more closely related to the domestic morph [6], with accompanying adaptations such as preferences for human blood and occupancy of man-made containers in their immature stages [4].…”
Section: Attributes Of Invasivenessmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…As aforementioned, domestic A. aegypti feed predominantly on human blood [4,22] and take multiple blood meals during each gonotrophic cycle [18]. Once female mosquitoes are infectious, they may transmit virus each time they probe or take a blood meal.…”
Section: Vectorial Capacitymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…El principal transmisor de dengue en Colombia es Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) (1), mosquito antropofílico asociado a conglomerados humanos (2), cuyos principales sitios de cría son los depósitos de agua para uso doméstico (3). Recientemente, este vector ha ganado mayor protagonismo debido a la aparición de los primeros casos de fiebre chikungunya en el país.…”
unclassified
“…They were distinguished by analysis of partial nucleotide sequencing of the YFV genome particularly the pre-membrane and envelope (prM/E) gene junction [9,10,13]. Most recently, South America genotype I has been divided into two major lineages named as old lineages (enclosing Old Para, and 1A, 1B, and 1C sub-lineages) and Modern lineage (enclosing Trinidad and Tobago, and 1D and 1E sub-lineages) ( Figure 1 and The Phylogenetic records validate that the vector of YF might ultimately have reached Asian subcontinent from the West African trade route, and thus Asian countries possibly became infected with A. aegypti later than the Americas [6,17,18]. Furthermore, there is certain evidence of geographical variation in A. Aegypti susceptibility against the YF which levitation the likelihood that Asian strains of YF vectors may be less competent [19,20].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 95%