2018
DOI: 10.3847/1538-3881/aad5dd
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High-time-resolution Photometry of AR Scorpii: Confirmation of the White Dwarf’s Spin-down

Abstract: The unique binary AR Scorpii consists of an asynchronously rotating, magnetized white dwarf (WD) that interacts with its red-dwarf companion to produce a large-amplitude, highly coherent pulsation every 1.97 minutes. Over the course of two years, we obtained thirty-nine hours of time-resolved, optical photometry of AR Sco at a typical cadence of 5 seconds to study this pulsation. We find that it undergoes significant changes across the binary orbital period and that its amplitude, phase, and waveform all vary … Show more

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Cited by 33 publications
(54 citation statements)
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“…Initial pulse timing studies after its discovery, over a baseline of 7 years, suggest that the white dwarf is slowing down, resulting in a frequency derivative of -ν s,wd = 2.86 × 10 −17 Hz s −1 , which for a ∼ 0.8 M ⊙ white dwarf (R wd ≈ 0.01R ⊙ ), infer a spin-down luminosity of approximately Lν s,wd ≈ 1.5 × 10 33 erg s −1 [1]). The result of a more recent study of the spin-evolution of the white dwarf [7] is inconsistent with any reported spin-down, while another study [8] shows an evidence of a spin-down rate through a beat frequency derivative -ν s,b = 5.14 × 10 −17 Hz s −1 with resultant spin-down power of Lν s,wd ≈ 3 × 10 33 erg s −1 which is approximately twice the value reported earlier [1].…”
Section: Introductioncontrasting
confidence: 56%
“…Initial pulse timing studies after its discovery, over a baseline of 7 years, suggest that the white dwarf is slowing down, resulting in a frequency derivative of -ν s,wd = 2.86 × 10 −17 Hz s −1 , which for a ∼ 0.8 M ⊙ white dwarf (R wd ≈ 0.01R ⊙ ), infer a spin-down luminosity of approximately Lν s,wd ≈ 1.5 × 10 33 erg s −1 [1]). The result of a more recent study of the spin-evolution of the white dwarf [7] is inconsistent with any reported spin-down, while another study [8] shows an evidence of a spin-down rate through a beat frequency derivative -ν s,b = 5.14 × 10 −17 Hz s −1 with resultant spin-down power of Lν s,wd ≈ 3 × 10 33 erg s −1 which is approximately twice the value reported earlier [1].…”
Section: Introductioncontrasting
confidence: 56%
“…J0240 appears to be only the second member of the AE Aqr subclass of IPs. The proposed WD pulsar, AR Sco (Marsh et al 2016;Stiller et al 2018;Garnavich et al 2019) may also be related to these AE Aqr-like propellers. The propellers and AR Sco appear to efficiently extract spin energy from their WDs, and are unusually strong radio emitters, implying a significant nonthermal power source derived from an interaction with the rapidly spinning magnetic WD.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 95%
“…Not only does it have a clearly evolved donor star, but it contains a rapidly spinning white dwarf, which is only a little slower than the white dwarf in AE Aqr itself. It will be fascinating to see whether, like AE Aqr and the possibly-related system AR Sco (Marsh et al 2016;Stiller et al 2018), the white dwarf in V1460 Her is in a state of rapid spin-down. This will require alias-free measurement of the pulsation phase over a number of years, not possible from the data we have in hand at present.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%