2013
DOI: 10.1017/s0950268813000538
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Hepatitis B and C co-infection in HIV/AIDS population in the state of Michigan

Abstract: A retrospective cohort study was conducted from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2009 in Michigan to estimate the prevalence of HIV and hepatitis co-infection and identify associated factors. The prevalence of co-infection was 4.1% [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.8-4.5]. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed a significant association between co-infection and being male and: of Black race [odds ratio (OR) 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-3.6] and of Other race (OR 3.5, 95% CI 1.7-7.0) compared to Hispanic race. A sig… Show more

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Cited by 7 publications
(6 citation statements)
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“…Overall, our findings are consistent with other analyses of HIV co-infection using state and local surveillance data. In Michigan, 1·8% of HIV-infected individuals were co-infected with HBV [17]. HIV/HCV infection estimates range from 2·2% to 23·6% from public health surveillance database matches in Colorado, Connecticut, Oregon, and Michigan [16, 17].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Overall, our findings are consistent with other analyses of HIV co-infection using state and local surveillance data. In Michigan, 1·8% of HIV-infected individuals were co-infected with HBV [17]. HIV/HCV infection estimates range from 2·2% to 23·6% from public health surveillance database matches in Colorado, Connecticut, Oregon, and Michigan [16, 17].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In Michigan, 1·8% of HIV-infected individuals were co-infected with HBV [17]. HIV/HCV infection estimates range from 2·2% to 23·6% from public health surveillance database matches in Colorado, Connecticut, Oregon, and Michigan [16, 17]. The co-infected proportions we found are lower than estimates from multicenter clinical cohorts, which have reported HBV prevalences of 9–11% among PLWHA in the USA and Europe [7, 12] and HCV prevalences of 20–37% among PLWHA in the USA [10, 11].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…A retrospective cohort design was utilized in which HIV/AIDS-infected individuals of all age groups residing in Michigan during the period 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2009 were matched to hepatitis B and hepatitis C cases from the same period [28]. The HIV/AIDS data were obtained from the enhanced HIV/AIDS Reporting System (eHARS) maintained by the HIV/STD/VH/TB Epidemiology Section whereas the hepatitis B and C data were obtained from the Michigan Disease Surveillance System maintained by the Surveillance and Infectious Disease Epidemiology Section of MDCH [28]. These datasets were linked together to enable matching of hepatitis B and C and HIV/AIDS cases to the same individual.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The exclusion criteria were patient without an incomplete medical record. From this 1333 cases, we excluded 39 cases perinatal transmission, removed 14 duplicate cases and removed another 6 outlier cases with the remaining 1274 HIV patients left ( Figure 1 The sample size was calculated using a single population proportion formula using 4.1% for HBV-HIV prevalence [26] and 6.6% for HCV-HIV prevalence [25] . Using 95% con dence interval and 5% precision with attrition rate of 20%, a minimum of at least 70 participants with HBV-HIV Co-infection and 107 minimum participants for HCV-HIV Co-infection were required.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%