2017
DOI: 10.1111/1477-9552.12232
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Hedonic Analysis of Consumers' Valuation of Country of Origin of Meat in the United Kingdom

Abstract: We estimate the implicit prices consumers are willing to pay for country of origin labels, using hedonic price methods and panel data for meat and meat products in the United Kingdom. Our results show that consumers place significant value on origin information across fresh and processed meat products, especially since the horsemeat incident in 2013. The findings also suggest that retailers have increased the use of voluntary labelling of processed meat products since the incident. Hence, further extension of … Show more

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Cited by 20 publications
(14 citation statements)
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“…Our results suggest that market price may be significantly influenced by the exogenous effect of the origin-declaration on products. That is in line with other studies [55][56][57][58][59][60]82] stressing the positive attitude of Italian consumers to recognizing a higher value to domestic and local products. That points to possible changes in market practices.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 91%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Our results suggest that market price may be significantly influenced by the exogenous effect of the origin-declaration on products. That is in line with other studies [55][56][57][58][59][60]82] stressing the positive attitude of Italian consumers to recognizing a higher value to domestic and local products. That points to possible changes in market practices.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 91%
“…Nevertheless, the hedonic approach is generally acknowledged as a good tool to evaluate the premium price for "credence attributes" such as certification, indications of origin, and other characteristics that consumers cannot verify otherwise, even after food purchase and consumption [73,74]. Though the model of the hedonic price is widely used to determine implicit prices in food and beverage sector, most recent studies are focused on wine, [75][76][77] oil [78], diary, eggs and meat [79][80][81][82][83], and fish [84,85]. To the best of our knowledge, no studies have explicitly analyzed pulses using hedonic price functions.…”
Section: Hedonic Price Methodologymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, home‐country bias can be tempered by events like the horsemeat scandal. UK research found that the implicit value attached to COO information on beef increased for all countries after the horsemeat scandal (Hussein and Fraser, ).…”
Section: Consumer Use Of Coolmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…A recent exception is the study by Hussein et al (2016) of UK meat. They report a price premium for a UK CoO label of £2 per kg compared to undeclared (no origin) meat.…”
Section: Coo and Stated Preference Researchmentioning
confidence: 99%