2017
DOI: 10.1016/j.ajic.2017.03.013
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Health care providers' perspectives for providing quality infection control measures at the neonatal intensive care unit, Cairo University Hospital

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Cited by 12 publications
(6 citation statements)
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“…Therefore, it is necessary to implement resources that allow a continuing education and that promote patient safety in healthcare environments and in the training of these workers. With this, satisfactory results regarding patient safety and risk management can be obtained in healthcare settings such as ICUs 21,27 .…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 98%
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“…Therefore, it is necessary to implement resources that allow a continuing education and that promote patient safety in healthcare environments and in the training of these workers. With this, satisfactory results regarding patient safety and risk management can be obtained in healthcare settings such as ICUs 21,27 .…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 98%
“…Given the above, it is possible to perceive that risk management in ICUs still has gaps and failures that need maintenance in order to improve the quality of care and reduce the risks of contamination 21,25 . In this perspective, it was observed that 20% of the articles show that the best way to prevent the risk of infection is to perform hand hygiene according to the current guidelines, which is the simplest and most effective measure to reduce infections.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In the literature search, infrastructure and system challenges were the most frequently occurring barriers to IPC measures within early intervention. These challenges included overcrowded wards, understaffing, lack of isolation facilities, inadequate ventilation, a lack of time to apply infection control standards, a lack of screening procedures and resource limitations such as poor access to PPE (Dramowski, Whitelaw, & Cotton, 2016 ; Gupta & Pursley, 2011 ; Olivier et al, 2018 ; Reid et al, 2011 ; Salem & Youssef, 2017 ; Triantafillou, Kopsidas, Kyriakousi, Zaoutis, & Szymczak, 2020 ; Verma et al, 2020 ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Then, two frequently reported recommendations were improved ‘supplies and infrastructure’ and ‘education and training’ for HCWs and caregivers. Salem and Youssef ( 2017 ) reported that without basic supplies and infrastructure, it is not possible for staff members to meet IPC standards or provide an acceptable level of care.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Nosocomial infection is the most important and fatal complication of very low birth weight infants. Children with NICU are susceptible to nosocomial infections [10] [11]. In recent years, the treatment and prognosis of infants with birth therefore, hospitalization complications can affect the prognosis of very low birth weight infants, reduce the incidence of complications during hospitalization, and significantly improve the prognosis of very low birth weight infants.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%