2017
DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2016.08.017
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Handgrip strength and associated sociodemographic and lifestyle factors: A systematic review of the adult population

Abstract: Older adults, females, those of lower educational level and not physically active had lower HGS levels. The adoption of standardization in relation to specific cutoff points for HGS classification becomes necessary in order to allow better comparison of results.

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Cited by 43 publications
(34 citation statements)
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References 36 publications
(56 reference statements)
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“…My results on men’s grip strength are consistent with previous cross-sectional evidence, which showed much smaller education gaps in men’s than in women’s grip strength (Botoseneanu et al 2015 ; de Lima et al 2017 ; Strand et al 2016 ). These studies have speculated that differences in grip strength among men might be suppressed because of manual work and excess body weight of lower-educated men—two health risks that are associated with higher levels of grip strength.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 90%
“…My results on men’s grip strength are consistent with previous cross-sectional evidence, which showed much smaller education gaps in men’s than in women’s grip strength (Botoseneanu et al 2015 ; de Lima et al 2017 ; Strand et al 2016 ). These studies have speculated that differences in grip strength among men might be suppressed because of manual work and excess body weight of lower-educated men—two health risks that are associated with higher levels of grip strength.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 90%
“…For instance, biological or environment factors such as health status, lifestyle, and demographic and socio‐economic characteristics vary greatly between countries with different handgrip strength levels. Along this line, education and socio‐economic status are factors that might explain differences in handgrip strength ranges among countries . Also, beyond ethnic differences in height and in skeletal muscle mass and function, there are well‐recognized differences in dietary protein intake between different countries, and this variation might also explain differences in muscle strength .…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Along this line, education and socio-economic status are factors that might explain differences in handgrip strength ranges among countries. 32 Also, beyond ethnic differences in height and in skeletal muscle mass and function, 33 there are well-recognized differences in dietary protein intake between different countries, and this variation might also explain differences in muscle strength. 34 Absolute strength has also been related to nutrition status and is reported to have positive influence on individuals' grip strength.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Besides ethnic differences in height and in skeletal muscle mass and function [ 9 ], there are well-recognized differences in dietary protein intake according to different countries, and the variation in dietary patterns may also explain differences in muscle strength [ 51 ]. Education and socio-economic status are other factors that can explain differences in HGS ranges among countries [ 20 , 52 , 53 ].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%