2008
DOI: 10.1590/s1679-62252008000400006
| View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: Distribution of anchovies (Clupeiformes, Engraulidae) was described in the Sepetiba Bay, a coastal area of Southeastern Brazil, to assess eventual mechanisms of habitat selection. Two fish sampling programmes were accomplished; one using beach seine (1998/2000) to catch juveniles in sandy beaches, and the other, using seines (1999/2000) to catch adults in deeper bay areas. Six species representing 4 genera were recorded: Anchoa tricolor, Anchoa januaria, Anchoa lyolepis, Cetengraulis edentulus, Engraulis ancho… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
1
1
1

Citation Types

1
11
0
7

Year Published

2011
2011
2023
2023

Publication Types

Select...
6
2

Relationship

0
8

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 17 publications
(19 citation statements)
references
References 24 publications
(26 reference statements)
1
11
0
7
Order By: Relevance
“…Recruitment occurs in protected, shallow areas that offer food and shelter against predators. Adults move during seasons between open coastal areas and bays, where they form large aggregations that are targeted by important fisheries (Araújo et al, 2008). Present phylogeographic analysis based on mitochondrial cyt-b sequences in E. anchoita from three different collecting regions in the Río de la Plata and the border of continental shelf revealed unexpected large values for haplotype and nucleotide diversity in this taxon.…”
Section: Pelagic Fishmentioning
confidence: 77%
“…Recruitment occurs in protected, shallow areas that offer food and shelter against predators. Adults move during seasons between open coastal areas and bays, where they form large aggregations that are targeted by important fisheries (Araújo et al, 2008). Present phylogeographic analysis based on mitochondrial cyt-b sequences in E. anchoita from three different collecting regions in the Río de la Plata and the border of continental shelf revealed unexpected large values for haplotype and nucleotide diversity in this taxon.…”
Section: Pelagic Fishmentioning
confidence: 77%
“…Surprisingly, our results partially contrasted with those of Souza-Conceição et al (2005) for Cetengraulis edentulus in a bay at Southern Brazil, which spawned in late spring and summer. These variations suggest a plasticity of C. edentulus to adjust their reproductive period in accordance with the local environmental characteristics, of which temperature, photoperiod and food availability have been suggested as determinants for engraulids reproduction in coastal bays (Silva et al, 2003;Araújo et al, 2008aAraújo et al, , 2008b. Comparing our results with those obtained for other C. edentulus or C. mysticetus populations, rising water temperatures seems to be the crucial factor for the spawning season of these species, which seems to start earlier (winter) for populations at lower latitudes (Beltrán-Leon, 2002; this study), and latter (spring) for those at higher latitudes (Souza-Conceição et al, 2005).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…This planktivorous species is well tolerant to changes in environmental conditions, being often found at inner zones of coastal bays, where salinity is generally low, temperatures are high, and phytoplankton biomass is high due to the great input of organic waste (Sergipense et al, 1999;Silva et al, 2003;Araújo et al, 2008a). Although the great importance of C. edentulus as fishery resource in coastal bays of Southeastern Brazil, especially on Guanabara Bay where accounted for 69% (ca.13,000 ton) of total landings in 2004, (Jablonski et al, 2006;Araújo et al, 2008a), the ecology of this species is barely known, especially on its reproductive biology (Souza-Conceição et al, 2005). The present study aimed to broaden the knowledge on C. edentulus reproduction in Guanabara Bay and test whether reproductive activity, gonadosomatic index and fecundity varied among seasons.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…C. edentulus first matures at 118mm total length (L 50 for both sexes), reaching 200mm at maximum (Silva et al, 2003;Souza-Conceição, Rodrigues-Ribeiro, & Castro-Silva, 2005). This species feeds mainly on phytoplankton and is widely tolerant to changes in environmental conditions (Krumme, Keuthen, Barletta, Saint-Paul, & Villwock, 2008;Giarrizzo & Krumme, 2009).It is often associated with muddy substrates of inner bay zones, where salinity is low, temperatures are high, and phytoplankton biomass is high due to the great input of organic waste (Sergipense, Caramaschi, & Sazima, 1999;Gay, Sergipense, & Rocha, 2000;Silva et al, 2003;SouzaConceição et al, 2005;Araújo, Silva, Santos, & Vasconcellos, 2008).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…edentulus began to be used as human food and fish meal since early 1980s, in part due to declining stocks of other traditionally exploited species, such as Sardinella brasiliensis (Whitehead et al, 1988;Jablonski et al, 2006), currently accounting for the major fishery resource in coastal bays of Rio de Janeiro, Southeastern Brazil (Araújo et al, 2008). Overall, commercial vessels operating at Guanabara Bay use purse seines (35-40m length; 12mm mesh) to catch preferentially C. edentulus but also other small pelagic fish species (i.e.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%