1995
DOI: 10.1111/j.1474-919x.1995.tb03234.x
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Group composition and contributions to breeding by Rufous Vangas Schetba rufa in Madagascar

Abstract: The social system of the Rufous Vanga Schetba rufa was studied in a deciduous dry forest in Ampijoroa, western Madagascar. The species lived in groups of two to four individuals. Groups typically contained one adult female, one or two adult males and sometimes a (presumed) immature. All group members appeared to defend the territory. The presumed immatures had spotted throats and were smaller than adults in body size. They helped feed young and guard the nest but did not incubate or brood.

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Cited by 22 publications
(16 citation statements)
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“…It is probable that Van Dam's Vanga is a territorial species, though territorial interaction among pairs was not observed because of their sparsely-distributed home ranges, which may be due to the small sized population (Langrand 1990). The home range of this species was rather large compared to other vangids, such as the Rufous Vanga (Schetba rufa) (Yamagishi et al 1995) or the White-headed Vanga (Leptopterus viridis) (Nakamura et al 2001).…”
Section: Foraging Ecologymentioning
confidence: 91%
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“…It is probable that Van Dam's Vanga is a territorial species, though territorial interaction among pairs was not observed because of their sparsely-distributed home ranges, which may be due to the small sized population (Langrand 1990). The home range of this species was rather large compared to other vangids, such as the Rufous Vanga (Schetba rufa) (Yamagishi et al 1995) or the White-headed Vanga (Leptopterus viridis) (Nakamura et al 2001).…”
Section: Foraging Ecologymentioning
confidence: 91%
“…This forest is part of the Ankarafantsika Strict Nature Reserve, classified as a western deciduous dry forest (Langrand 1990). It is a deciduous broad-leaved forest, dominated by trees of three Strichnos species (see Yamagishi et al [1995] for a more detailed description of the site).…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…The Rufous Vanga is endemic to Madagascar (Langrand 1990). Recently, its breeding biology has been clarified by Yamagishi et al (1995), Eguchi et al (2001), and, who have confirmed that it is a cooperative breeder. Although the Rufous Vanga breeds monogamously, some monogamous pairs are accompanied by one or more one-year-old males or adult males, or both.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 98%