2013
DOI: 10.1177/0020715213494395
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Abstract: This article addresses the question of whether globalization impacts individual preferences to exclude immigrants from national welfare systems ('welfare chauvinism'). Intergroup contact theory and arguments from the 'new cosmopolitanism' debate suggest that cross-border social contacts ('social globalization') foster a willingness to include and accept newcomers. However, group conflict theory suggests that trade openness ('economic globalization') can unleash feelings of insecurity and trigger welfare chauvi… Show more

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Cited by 87 publications
(80 citation statements)
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References 71 publications
(90 reference statements)
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“…The only significant interaction involving a country-level covariate is GRI with changes in government expenditures/GDP, which is negatively associated with PIT. This suggests that the state's ability to provide services and resources can possibly offset the negative aspects of the Recession [17,56,57]. This too supports competitive threat theory by indicating that the state has some capacity to alleviate sources of competition created by immigration.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 56%
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“…The only significant interaction involving a country-level covariate is GRI with changes in government expenditures/GDP, which is negatively associated with PIT. This suggests that the state's ability to provide services and resources can possibly offset the negative aspects of the Recession [17,56,57]. This too supports competitive threat theory by indicating that the state has some capacity to alleviate sources of competition created by immigration.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 56%
“…Many studies have investigated the relationship between economic decline and anti-immigrant sentiment, but their empirical findings are mixed. Some studies provide evidence that economic decline increases anti-immigrant sentiment [12,13], whereas others find no significant relationship [14][15][16][17][18][19]. A few studies have focused more specifically on the connection between the Great Recession and anti-immigrant attitudes, but their findings have also been mixed [4,20].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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