2012
DOI: 10.1007/s00436-012-3121-5
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Genetic characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Trypanosoma evansi in Iranian dromedary camels

Abstract: Whole blood samples were collected from 117 male clinically healthy Camelus dromedarius aged between 6 months to 18 years from several farms in Yazd Province of Iran. Trypanosoma evansi-affected camels were detected by Giemsa-stained blood smears, and the positive blood samples (4 out of 117) were submitted to PCR examination and phylogenetic analysis. Basic Local Alignment Search Tool data of the obtained complete internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences revealed that they corresponded to those of T. evans… Show more

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Cited by 28 publications
(11 citation statements)
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“…In this study, a phylogenetic and molecular analysis of the 18S rRNA sequences has shown that one genotype of T. evansi was present in camels from Palestine. However, for more accurate phylogenetic analyses, it is important to sequence additional non-coding DNA regions from T. evansi that are genetically diverse such as the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region [50]. A study conducted by Pourjafar et al [50] showed that a phylogenetic analysis based on ITS2 nucleotide sequences revealed heterogeneity among the tested T. evansi parasites.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In this study, a phylogenetic and molecular analysis of the 18S rRNA sequences has shown that one genotype of T. evansi was present in camels from Palestine. However, for more accurate phylogenetic analyses, it is important to sequence additional non-coding DNA regions from T. evansi that are genetically diverse such as the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region [50]. A study conducted by Pourjafar et al [50] showed that a phylogenetic analysis based on ITS2 nucleotide sequences revealed heterogeneity among the tested T. evansi parasites.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Indeed, when leaving the tsetse belt “jail” in which it was trapped by its cyclical development in tsetse flies, T. evansi developed, or simply expressed, a surprising and spectacular ability to develop in a very large range of hosts leading to a no less spectacular, potentially unlimited, geographical distribution. Although T. evansi has long been claimed to be a genetically and morphologically highly homogeneous parasite [205], recent investigations have demonstrated more diversity than expected [206]. Moreover, it is obvious, when comparing T. evansi to T. brucei , that some slight modifications in the nucleotidic sequence of a genome have deeply impacted the biological properties of a parasite, affording it very different characteristics and behaviours, both in terms of host range, pathogenicity, transmission, epidemiology, and geographical distribution.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In this context, the introduction of infected animals is a risk factor for spread of the disease. Furthermore, Pourjafar et al (2013) showed that T. evansi probably related to the capacity for rapid adaptation to different host species and environments. We recommend undertaking additional studies to further understand the importance of co-infection between the two pathogens.…”
Section: Phylogenetic Analysismentioning
confidence: 99%