2016
DOI: 10.1590/1676-0611-bn-2015-0088
| View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: Fragment edge and isolation affect the food web: effects on the strength of interactions among trophic guilds. Biota Neotropica. 16(2): e20150088. http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/1676-0611- BN-2015-0088 Abstract: Habitat loss and fragmentation are processes that may affect communities by changing species interactions. These changes occur because the strength of linkages between species is not exclusively dependent on predator and prey traits. Species interaction changes also depend on the spatial context in which… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
4
1

Citation Types

0
8
0
1

Year Published

2018
2018
2022
2022

Publication Types

Select...
5

Relationship

0
5

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 6 publications
(9 citation statements)
references
References 50 publications
(52 reference statements)
0
8
0
1
Order By: Relevance
“…), but edge effects may change species dynamics and create non‐linear community responses (Melo et al. ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…), but edge effects may change species dynamics and create non‐linear community responses (Melo et al. ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Also, it remains unclear whether the relative importance of these trophic or non-trophic pathways shifts with the patch size of foundation species (Angelini et al 2015). This may be important as larger patches can sustain similar species densities (Li et al 2017), but edge effects may change species dynamics and create non-linear community responses (Melo et al 2016).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Habitat loss and fragmentation may affect mammalian communities, especially by modifications in landscape matrix, which act as a selective filter for fauna (Ceballos & Ehrlich, 2002). The size, structure and shape of small fragments may contribute to form a mosaic of qualitatively different habitats throughout the landscape, providing greater heterogeneity and structural complexity (Bernardo & Melo, 2013;Fleschutz et al, 2016;Melo et al, 2016). Species show many kinds of responses to habitat fragmentation: some are advantaged and increase in abundance, while others decline and become locally extinct (Bennett & Saunders, 2010).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Agricultural land is inhospitable to most forest species [ 9 , 11 ] and such matrices exert pressure on forest fragments [ 20 , 21 ], working as a biodiversity filter, which affects the movement of species between and within fragments [ 9 ]. They may also exert negative influences by altering components of the food web [ 22 ], homogenizing the community [ 23 ], and facilitating the spread of exotic and invasive species [ 24 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%