2017
DOI: 10.2196/jmir.6368
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Abstract: Background “Fitspiration” (also known as “fitspo”) aims to inspire individuals to exercise and be healthy, but emerging research indicates exposure can negatively impact female body image. Fitspiration is frequently accessed on social media; however, it is currently unclear the degree to which messages about body image and exercise differ by gender of the subject. Objective The aim of our study was to conduct a content analysis to identify the characteristics of fitspir… Show more

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Cited by 182 publications
(161 citation statements)
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References 26 publications
(61 reference statements)
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“…The issues of frustration, guilt and feeling addicted to viewing Fitspirational posts are novel insights emerging from the current study. Negative effects of exposure to Fitspiration on self-esteem, body image and disordered eating have been demonstrated [3] and speculated upon [7][8][9][10][11][12][13] previously and the accounts of our participants are in line with these studies and also the proposition that social comparison on the basis of appearance is one of the routes by which Fitspiration produces negative psychological effects [3].…”
Section: Discussion Key Findingssupporting
confidence: 84%
“…The existing literature is limited, given the newness of the trend, but has centred around the concerning nature of the images and content and possible effects on mental health (including disordered eating), body image and self-esteem. A number of studies using content analysis have concurred in finding that Fitspiration posts perpetuate pervading body image ideals (very lean females, very muscular men), are sexually objectifying, and tend to emphasise appearance over health [7][8][9][10][11]. However, Deighton-Smith's [11] analysis also identified some potentially positive features including the emphasis placed on personal control and commitment, and the building of a sense of community and social support.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Participants already viewed and demonstrated a preference to seek out images of bodies, often minimally clothed and sexualised. 30 Viewing this content may itself increase body dissatisfaction, 31 masking additional effects of pornography. Furthermore, higher baseline levels of psychological distress may have hindered detection of additional effects of pornography.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…For a fine-grained analysis, qualitative aspects, and semantic interpretation, manual approaches (such as: coding) are well-suited. The methods used were based on an exploratory analysis with Keyhole on a subset of images to identify high level themes, inspired by prior work [10]. 10 unrelated posts were discarded; 490 images remained for analysis.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Besides seeking health information online, caregivers are also active users of social media [35]. Despite risks involving privacy and social comparisons [10], social media aids in healthcare enabling users to find support, information and motivation [21]. Thanks to the usage of social media to exchange medical information and provide support [33], social media analytics has become viable for large-scale public health studies [18].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%