2021
DOI: 10.1007/s11248-020-00230-x
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Fitness of F1 hybrids between 10 maternal wild soybean populations and transgenic soybean

Abstract: The releasing of transgenic soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) into farming systems raises concerns that transgenes might escape from the soybeans via pollen into their endemic wild relatives, the wild soybean (Glycine soja Sieb. et Zucc.). The fitness of F1 hybrids obtained from 10 wild soybean populations collected from China and transgenic glyphosate-resistant soybean was measured without weed competition, as well as one JLBC-1 F1 hybrid under weed competition. All crossed seeds emerged at a lower rate from … Show more

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Cited by 8 publications
(6 citation statements)
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“…In contrast to the results of this study, Kuroda et al (2013) suggested that the hybrid progeny of cultivated and wild soybeans contain some artificial domestication genes, so the fitness of hybrid progeny of cultivated and wild soybeans may be lower than that of wild soybeans. When transgenic soybeans with the EPSPS gene (developed by Nanjing Agricultural University) were crossed with wild soybeans from 10 different regions, the seed germination percentage, plant height, biomass, pods per plant, and 100-seed weight of F 1 were lower than those of wild soybeans, indicating that the gene transfer was not conducive to the survival of hybrid offspring in natural environments ( Liu et al, 2021 ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…In contrast to the results of this study, Kuroda et al (2013) suggested that the hybrid progeny of cultivated and wild soybeans contain some artificial domestication genes, so the fitness of hybrid progeny of cultivated and wild soybeans may be lower than that of wild soybeans. When transgenic soybeans with the EPSPS gene (developed by Nanjing Agricultural University) were crossed with wild soybeans from 10 different regions, the seed germination percentage, plant height, biomass, pods per plant, and 100-seed weight of F 1 were lower than those of wild soybeans, indicating that the gene transfer was not conducive to the survival of hybrid offspring in natural environments ( Liu et al, 2021 ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, the relevant national authorities need scientific and technical support in making decisions on whether to approve the industrialization of transgenic soybeans and in managing the resulting environmental risks (especially controlling the introduction of foreign genes into wild soybeans). To date, there have been four studies conducted on the fitness of hybrid progeny between EPSPS- transgenic and wild soybeans, of which one study showed that the fitness of F 1 hybrids of them in different regions was lower than that of wild soybeans ( Liu et al, 2021 ). The results of the remaining three showed that, compared to wild soybeans, the fitness of those expressing the EPSPS gene did not change significantly in the absence of glyphosate and was even significantly higher than that of wild soybeans in some fitness parameters, indicating that wild soybeans expressing the EPSPS gene may be more invasive than their wild soybean parents ( Guan et al, 2015 ; Kan et al, 2015 ; Yook et al, 2021 ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…When hybridization occurs, the hybrid lineages harbor alleles from both progenitors, and the process of introgression will depend on the fitness of the hybrids relative to their parents (Mercer et al, 2007; Presotto et al, 2019). Hybrids commonly exhibit intermediate phenotypes and reduced fitness compared to their parents (Mercer et al, 2006; Sahoo et al, 2010; Hooftman et al, 2015; Martin et al, 2019; Yue et al, 2021), with nonviable or sterile offspring in extreme cases (Rieseberg et al, 2007). If novel alleles reduce hybrid fitness, these alleles may not prevail or introgress.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…When hybridization occurs, the hybrid lineages harbor alleles from both progenitors, and the process of introgression will depend on the fitness of the hybrids relative to their parents (Mercer et al, 2007; Presotto et al, 2019). Hybrids commonly exhibit intermediate and maladapted phenotypes and reduced fitness compared to their parents (Mercer et al, 2006; Sahoo et al, 2010; Hooftman et al, 2015; Martin et al, 2019; Yue et al, 2021), with nonviable or sterile offspring in extreme cases (Rieseberg et al, 2007). If novel alleles reduce hybrid fitness, these alleles may not prevail or introgress.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%