2022
DOI: 10.1186/s13071-021-05116-3
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First report of the zoonotic nematode Baylisascaris procyonis in non-native raccoons (Procyon lotor) from Italy

Abstract: Baylisascaris procyonis is a nematode parasite of the raccoon (Procyon lotor), and it can be responsible for a severe form of larva migrans in humans. This parasite has been reported from many countries all over the world, after translocation of its natural host outside its native geographic range, North America. In the period between January and August 2021, 21 raccoons were cage-trapped and euthanized in Tuscany (Central Italy), in the context of a plan aimed at eradicating a reproductive population of this … Show more

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Cited by 14 publications
(10 citation statements)
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“…Morphological and morphometric features of all the ascarids detected were consistent with those of B. procyonis : length 9–16 cm, width 1–3 mm, white-yellowish to tan-colored, with a prominent dark alimentary tract. Male parasites showed typical features of the genus Baylisascaris , such as the presence of cervical alae with cuticular bars, dorsal and subventral labial papillae distinctly double, pericloacal area rugosa, uniform spicules, and discrete precloacal and postcloacal groups of papillae on the tail [ 12 ]. Molecular analyses of twenty-five adult parasites (one for each positive raccoon) confirmed the phenotypic identification, resulting in a 100% coverage and identity with a B. procyonis -deposited sequence (GenBank accession number: MZ092853), and our previously deposited sequence (GenBank accession number: OU974763.1) [ 12 ].…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Morphological and morphometric features of all the ascarids detected were consistent with those of B. procyonis : length 9–16 cm, width 1–3 mm, white-yellowish to tan-colored, with a prominent dark alimentary tract. Male parasites showed typical features of the genus Baylisascaris , such as the presence of cervical alae with cuticular bars, dorsal and subventral labial papillae distinctly double, pericloacal area rugosa, uniform spicules, and discrete precloacal and postcloacal groups of papillae on the tail [ 12 ]. Molecular analyses of twenty-five adult parasites (one for each positive raccoon) confirmed the phenotypic identification, resulting in a 100% coverage and identity with a B. procyonis -deposited sequence (GenBank accession number: MZ092853), and our previously deposited sequence (GenBank accession number: OU974763.1) [ 12 ].…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Recovered parasites were preserved in 70% ethanol and subsequently submitted to morphologic and morphometric identification. In the case of ascarid parasites, fragments (approximately 1 cm long) of adult parasites (one specimen for each infected raccoon) were submitted for molecular identification using a next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based amplicon sequencing approach, as described by Lombardo et al in 2022 [ 12 ]. Moreover, from each raccoon, samples of rectal content, ileum, skeletal muscles (diaphragm and tibialis muscles), urine, and nasal (choanae) lavage fluid were also collected.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…The infected host sheds millions of eggs daily that become infective (containing the third-stage larva, L3) in approximately 10–12 days and remain infective for months or years [ 204 ]. In Europe, B. procyonis infection in raccoons has been documented in over 70% of raccoons in central Germany [ 196 , 205 ] and in 33.3% in Italy at necropsy [ 206 ]. Raccoons infected with B .…”
Section: Procionidaementioning
confidence: 99%
“…While not all European raccoon populations are parasitised by B. procyonis , the roundworm is currently increasing its geographic distribution [ 29 32 ]. For effective eradication and/or management actions, it is important to understand whether the parasite was introduced through a distinct founder event or through natural dispersal of infected raccoons [ 31 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%