2023
DOI: 10.1590/1809-4392202300431
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First record of a snake call in South America: the unusual sound of an ornate snail-eater Dipsas catesbyi

Igor Yuri FERNANDES,
Esteban Diego KOCH,
Alexander Tamanini MÔNICO

Abstract: The auditory systems and sound dynamics in snakes are frequent objects of debate. The known frequency of sounds produced by snakes ranges from 0.2 to 9.5 kHz. Here we report the first record of a vocalization by the South American snake Dipsas catesbyi. The call was recorded oportunistically in June 2021 upon manipulation, and had a duration of 0.06 seconds, reaching 3036 Hz in its peak frequency with a modulated note, emitted through exhalation of air through the larynx. We hypothesize that structured vocal e… Show more

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“…If on the one hand, we can not rule out the possibility of the oral emission recorded in A. alba being just an agony sound from an individual that inexplicably died minutes later. On the other hand, considering the emission context (facing a potential predator) and the body posture (wide open mouth), we can also consider that the oral emission of A. alba may be considered a defensive display, resembling the distress call recently described to the snake Dipsas catesbyi (Fernandes et al., 2023).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…If on the one hand, we can not rule out the possibility of the oral emission recorded in A. alba being just an agony sound from an individual that inexplicably died minutes later. On the other hand, considering the emission context (facing a potential predator) and the body posture (wide open mouth), we can also consider that the oral emission of A. alba may be considered a defensive display, resembling the distress call recently described to the snake Dipsas catesbyi (Fernandes et al., 2023).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%