2012
DOI: 10.1007/s13744-012-0094-0
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Field Evaluation of Bt Cotton Crop Impact on Nontarget Pests: Cotton Aphid and Boll Weevil

Abstract: Bt cotton plants expressing Cry1Ac protein have high specificity for the control of lepidopteran larvae. However, studies conducted in several countries have shown these plants have a differential impact on nontarget herbivores. The aim of this study was to compare the colonization rates and population abundance of the cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae) and the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), in plots of Bt (Nuopal) and non-Bt cotton (Delta Opal) in … Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
4
1

Citation Types

0
13
1

Year Published

2013
2013
2024
2024

Publication Types

Select...
8
1
1

Relationship

0
10

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 15 publications
(14 citation statements)
references
References 32 publications
(33 reference statements)
0
13
1
Order By: Relevance
“…Although Bollgard II ® varieties containing the additional δ-endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis , Cry2A (b), have been employed in both Australia and the United States ( Morse, 2016 ), the single toxin Bt-cotton (Bollgard I) has dominated domestic production in Asia and Africa ( Huang et al, 2010 ; Clive, 2012 ). People still use the single toxin Bt-cotton, expressing its own insecticidal protein, to effectively reduce losses to pests such as cotton boll worm ( Sujii et al, 2013 ), and to reduce pesticide use in those countries. The use of Bt-cotton produces dramatic economic and ecological benefits ( Dhillon and Sharma, 2013 ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Although Bollgard II ® varieties containing the additional δ-endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis , Cry2A (b), have been employed in both Australia and the United States ( Morse, 2016 ), the single toxin Bt-cotton (Bollgard I) has dominated domestic production in Asia and Africa ( Huang et al, 2010 ; Clive, 2012 ). People still use the single toxin Bt-cotton, expressing its own insecticidal protein, to effectively reduce losses to pests such as cotton boll worm ( Sujii et al, 2013 ), and to reduce pesticide use in those countries. The use of Bt-cotton produces dramatic economic and ecological benefits ( Dhillon and Sharma, 2013 ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Adopting farmers are either still using significant numbers of insecticide applications to control secondary pests, or the damage caused by these pests has increased. Some examples include South Africa (Hofs et al ., ; Schnurr, ), Burkina Faso (Dowd‐Uribe, ), Pakistan (Jaleel et al ., ), Australia (Wilson et al ., ), Brazil (Sujii et al ., ) and Mexico (Traxler and Godoy‐Avila, ).…”
Section: Impact Of Secondary Pests On Bt Cropsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The efficacy of this technology is high against some of these species, and Bt resistance is a frequent concern in such a scenario receiving considerable attention (Santos‐Amaya et al., 2017; Siegfried & Jurat‐Fuentes, 2016; Sorgatto et al., 2015). Bt non‐target species also received attention, and negligible effects prevail in different regions (Duan et al., 2008; Lima et al., 2013; Nascimento et al., 2021; Sujii et al., 2013). However, studies of Bt cotton impact in arthropod assemblages and communities are not as frequent, but again usually report negligible effects on soil (Krogh et al., 2020; Tian et al., 2020)‐ and plant‐associated species (Marvier et al., 2007; Sisterson et al., 2004; Sujii et al., 2013; Torres & Ruberson, 2005), despite their limitations akin to those of pesticide impact assessments (Guedes et al., 2016, 2017).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%