2008
DOI: 10.1590/s0073-47212008000300011
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Abstract: , 17 samples were taken, distributed in three periods: before seeding, during the development of the rice plants and after the harvest. Samples were done in the morning using sweeping nets (35 cm diameter), 50 sweeps in each of four randomly chosen transects. A total of 918 spiders were sampled, distributed in 14 families, mostly Araneidae, Anyphaenidae, Oxyopidae and Tetragnathidae. Among the adults, 38 morphospecies were found, the most abundant were Alpaida veniliae (Keyserling, 1865), Tetragnatha nitens (A… Show more

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Cited by 19 publications
(26 citation statements)
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“…The abundance of spider and beetle assemblages did not show a significant relationship with the amount of precipitation (spiders: Spearman, rho 38 = 0.26, P = 0.1148; beetles: rho 38 = 0.09, P = 0.5657). Contrary to our results, other investigations in which spiders (Carrel 2001;Rodrigues et al 2008) and beetles (Orozco & Perez 2008;Grimbacher & Stork 2009) were studied found that the amount of precipitation influenced their abundance. The species richness of spider assemblages differed significantly between the three groups of nests (Student's t-test, t 2 = 5.00, P = 0.0377), while in the case of beetle assemblages the difference in species richness was not significant (t 2 = 2.60, P = 0.1217).…”
Section: Resultscontrasting
confidence: 99%
“…The abundance of spider and beetle assemblages did not show a significant relationship with the amount of precipitation (spiders: Spearman, rho 38 = 0.26, P = 0.1148; beetles: rho 38 = 0.09, P = 0.5657). Contrary to our results, other investigations in which spiders (Carrel 2001;Rodrigues et al 2008) and beetles (Orozco & Perez 2008;Grimbacher & Stork 2009) were studied found that the amount of precipitation influenced their abundance. The species richness of spider assemblages differed significantly between the three groups of nests (Student's t-test, t 2 = 5.00, P = 0.0377), while in the case of beetle assemblages the difference in species richness was not significant (t 2 = 2.60, P = 0.1217).…”
Section: Resultscontrasting
confidence: 99%
“…Seasonal variation on soil use in agricultural areas, e.g. before and after crop planting, can also affect invertebrates composition (RODRIGUES et al, 2008).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Specifically in South Brazil, some attempts were done in order to compare spider diversity patterns between agroecosystems and adjacent native ecosystems, such as the studies of Baldissera et al (2008) in tree plantations, including pine, and native Araucaria forest, Rodrigues et al (2009) in rice field, grassland and native forest, and Rodrigues et al (2010) in Eucalyptus plantations and natural grasslands. Other studies in agroecosystems in South Brazil describe spider assemblages, for example, in olive groves (Ricalde et al, 2016), corn plantations (Da Silva et al, 2014), citrus groves (Ott et al, 2007) and irrigated rice (Rodrigues et al, 2008). Here we also expect to contribute with a very first view of the ground spider assemblages inhabiting pine plantations in the state of Rio Grande do Sul.…”
mentioning
confidence: 54%