2015
DOI: 10.1590/s1677-5538.ibju.2014.0497
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Factors associated with the Journal Impact Factor (JIF) for Urology and Nephrology Journals

Abstract: Purpose:The Journal Impact Factor (JIF) is an index used to compare a journal's quality among academic journals and it is commonly used as a proxy for journal quality. We sought to examine the JIF in order to elucidate the main predictors of the index while generating awareness among scientific community regarding need to modify the index calculation in the attempt to turn it more accurate.Materials and Methods:Under the Urology and Nephrology category in the Journal Citations Report Website, the top 17 Journa… Show more

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Cited by 5 publications
(12 citation statements)
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“…In the same vein, SC was also found by Torabian et al [30] to be significantly related to JIT for open access medical journals and the same was observed for ecology journals [31]. A positive correlation between SC and JIT was also reported in the study of Urology and Nephrology Journals [32]. Readers are also referred to Hartley [33].…”
Section: Opponent Of Self-citationsupporting
confidence: 71%
“…In the same vein, SC was also found by Torabian et al [30] to be significantly related to JIT for open access medical journals and the same was observed for ecology journals [31]. A positive correlation between SC and JIT was also reported in the study of Urology and Nephrology Journals [32]. Readers are also referred to Hartley [33].…”
Section: Opponent Of Self-citationsupporting
confidence: 71%
“…Because previous studies of the scientific literature within other medical specialties and the basic sciences have shown that journal self‐citations (and possible promotion of self‐citations) could be a mechanism by which journals raise their IF, 30 , 33 we sought to determine whether this was also the case among otolaryngology journals. We therefore explored this by comparing the IF excluding self‐citations (IFsSC) between otolaryngology journals in the top quartile versus bottom 75th percentile (Table S1 ).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Indexers of Thomson Reuters databases should respond to arguments that point to the need for revising the original formula of the JIF (6263). Remarkably, editorials and letters, the so-called noncitable items, which have long been excluded from the denominator of the JIF, have changed their influence over the past decades.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%