2005
DOI: 10.1590/s1519-69842005000200018
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Extensive consumption of Tabebuia aurea (Manso) Benth. & Hook. (Bignoniaceae) nectar by parrots in a tecoma savanna in the southern Pantanal (Brazil)

Abstract: Neotropical parrots forage for various food items such as seeds, fruit pulp, flowers, young leaves, and even arthropods. While foraging, many species wander over large areas that include both open and closed habitats. In this study, I examined parrot foraging activity during a brief synchronous and massive flowering in August 1998 in a tecoma savanna (dominated by Tabebuia aurea) in the southern Pantanal. Six parrot species, ranging from the small Brotogeris chiriri to the large Amazona aestiva, foraged for T.… Show more

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Cited by 29 publications
(25 citation statements)
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“…Consequently, as fruit patches are progressively becoming scattered arranged within a matrix of pastures and crop areas, Blue-and-Yellow Macaws might incur in severe foraging costs (Graham, 2001) while moving to impoverished feeding areas (Ragusa-Netto, 2006). However, as these parrots often experience food shortage due to the erratic seasonality of fruiting patterns (Bullock and Solís-Magallanes, 1990;Funch et al, 2002;RagusaNetto and Silva, 2007), they are able to move over large areas searching for suitable food sources (Renton, 2001;Ragusa-Netto, 2005. In fact, for nomadic frugivores the sites of a habitat mosaic could be important in distinct periods of the year (van Schaik et al, 1993;Renton, 2001;Ragusa-Netto, 2004, 2007a, 2008bMelo et al, 2009).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Consequently, as fruit patches are progressively becoming scattered arranged within a matrix of pastures and crop areas, Blue-and-Yellow Macaws might incur in severe foraging costs (Graham, 2001) while moving to impoverished feeding areas (Ragusa-Netto, 2006). However, as these parrots often experience food shortage due to the erratic seasonality of fruiting patterns (Bullock and Solís-Magallanes, 1990;Funch et al, 2002;RagusaNetto and Silva, 2007), they are able to move over large areas searching for suitable food sources (Renton, 2001;Ragusa-Netto, 2005. In fact, for nomadic frugivores the sites of a habitat mosaic could be important in distinct periods of the year (van Schaik et al, 1993;Renton, 2001;Ragusa-Netto, 2004, 2007a, 2008bMelo et al, 2009).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Recently, some parrot species have been identified as possible tree-species pollinators, however few studies have focused on parrotflower relationships (but see Vicentini & Fischer, 1999;Cotton, 2001;Ragusa-Netto, 2002). Also, studies have also shown that these parrots exhibit low reproductive rates, usually nest in tree holes, are long-lived, have no all-purpose territories, and forage over large areas of various types so as to exploit food resources that are both plentiful and ephemeral (Renton, 2001;Ragusa-Netto, 2004;2005). Due to their mobility and dietary flexibility, parrots can adjust to the marked seasonality of food resource production in forest canopies (Renton, 2001).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Due to their mobility and dietary flexibility, parrots can adjust to the marked seasonality of food resource production in forest canopies (Renton, 2001). For example, even though Neotropical parrots customarily forage on fruits and seeds, flower consumption may be vital when fruit production declines, mainly during the dry season (Galetti, 1993;Ragusa-Netto, 2004, 2005. Unlike some other species, Neotropical parrots seldom forage on arthropods (del Hoyo et al, 1997;Renton, 2001).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…While some species may be both habitat and foraging specialists, most of them are generalist, often exhibiting seasonal dietary shifts (Galetti, 1993;Ragusa-Netto, 2004;Ragusa-Netto and Fecchio, 2006), and movements within vegetation mosaics according to resource availability (Renton, 2001;Ragusa-Netto, 2005).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Therefore, they may play such ecological roles as seed predators (Janzen, 1981;Francisco et al, 2002;Ragusa-Netto, 2002b), and pollinators of tree species (Vicentini and Fischer, 1999;Coton, 2001;Ragusa-Netto, 2002a), although parakeets often exploit nectar, destructively damaging much of the flower crops. Hence, they potentially also act as pre-dispersal seed predators by reducing the fruit set (Cotton, 2001;Ragusa-Netto, 2002a, 2005.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%