2015
DOI: 10.1590/s0004-28032015000100009
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Abstract: -Background -Evidence suggests a nutritional transition process in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Obesity, which was once an uncommon occurrence in such patients, has grown in this population at the same prevalence rate as that found in the general population, bringing with it an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Objective -The aim of the present study was to determine the nutritional status and occurrence of cardiovascular risk factors in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Methods -A… Show more

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Cited by 6 publications
(10 citation statements)
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References 29 publications
(43 reference statements)
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“…Obesity, once considered a rare condition in IBD, has become increasingly prevalent, mainly in the last two decades (2,7) . It is believed that this is related to increased number of comorbidities, such as diabetes, hypertension, thromboembolic disease, infections, cancer (7) .…”
Section: Nutritional Status and Body Composition Of Patients With Ulcmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Obesity, once considered a rare condition in IBD, has become increasingly prevalent, mainly in the last two decades (2,7) . It is believed that this is related to increased number of comorbidities, such as diabetes, hypertension, thromboembolic disease, infections, cancer (7) .…”
Section: Nutritional Status and Body Composition Of Patients With Ulcmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…13,14 In addition to malnutrition, changes in body composition such as the occurrence of sarcopenia have been described in patients with CD. [15][16][17][18] Schneider et al describe the occurrence of sarcopenia in 60% of patients with CD even during clinical remission. 18 Loss of lean mass (LM) has been associated with worsening of bone mineral density, increased morbidity, loss of muscle strength, and increased risk of infectious complications.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Over-nourishment and obesity affects up to 55% of patients with IBD in the Western hemisphere[23,54]. In spite of this, decreased muscle mass and micronutrient deficiencies remain prevalent even among the obese population with IBD ( i.e ., sarcopenic obesity), and are not accurately assessed by traditional nutrition assessment methods[33,55-57]. Although there is conflicting data on the association of obesity itself with IBD related clinical outcomes[58-61], the syndrome of “sarcopenic-obesity” likely does have implications in predicting relevant clinical outcomes, and warrants further in-vestigation[33].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%