2019
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-45445-z
View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: Human parechovirus type 3 (HPeV3) can cause severe sepsis-like illness in young infants and may be associated with long term neurodevelopmental delay later in childhood. We investigated the molecular epidemiology of HPeV infection in thirty three infants requiring hospitalization before, during and after the peak of the 2017/18 HPeV epidemic wave in Australia. During the peak of the epidemic, all cases were infected with an HPeV3, while before and after the peak, HPeV1 was the predominant type detected. The pr… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
3
2

Citation Types

1
14
0

Year Published

2019
2019
2019
2019

Publication Types

Select...
1

Relationship

0
1

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 12 publications
(63 citation statements)
references
References 38 publications
(63 reference statements)
1
14
0
Order By: Relevance
“…However, recent studies in Europe have identified HPeV3 causing disease in young children in the United Kingdom and Germany between 2016 and 2018 with highly similar viral capsid protein 1 (VP1) sequences to the Australian recombinant HPeV3, although this is only based on partial sequencing (256–807 nucleotides) of the capsid region [5,6]. This may support our previous finding that this HPeV3 likely continued to circulate in people between Australian epidemics, based on the molecular evolution of the virus between epidemics [2]. However, in the absence of further sequencing of these European viruses, it is impossible to determine their exact HPeV3 lineage, as these viruses frequently recombine [3,7,8].…”
Section: Introductionsupporting
confidence: 68%
See 4 more Smart Citations
“…However, recent studies in Europe have identified HPeV3 causing disease in young children in the United Kingdom and Germany between 2016 and 2018 with highly similar viral capsid protein 1 (VP1) sequences to the Australian recombinant HPeV3, although this is only based on partial sequencing (256–807 nucleotides) of the capsid region [5,6]. This may support our previous finding that this HPeV3 likely continued to circulate in people between Australian epidemics, based on the molecular evolution of the virus between epidemics [2]. However, in the absence of further sequencing of these European viruses, it is impossible to determine their exact HPeV3 lineage, as these viruses frequently recombine [3,7,8].…”
Section: Introductionsupporting
confidence: 68%
“…A recombinant human parechovirus type 3 has caused three epidemics in Australia approximately every two years between 2013 and 2018 [1,2,3,20]. While 2019 was predicted to be the year in which the next HPeV3 epidemic in Australia was likely to occur, instead a recombinant HPeV5 has been the predominant parechovirus infection detected in sick infants in 2019.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 3 more Smart Citations